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Cable bacteria at oxygen-releasing roots of aquatic plants: a widespread and diverse plant-microbe association

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Cable bacteria at oxygen-releasing roots of aquatic plants: a widespread and diverse plant-microbe association. / Scholz, Vincent V; Martin, Belinda C; Meyer, Raïssa; Schramm, Andreas; Fraser, Matthew W; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Kendrick, Gary A; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Burdorf, Laurine D W; Marshall, Ian P G.

I: New Phytologist, 23.04.2021.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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@article{2dbcfb5143744f64bac633ecaa183572,
title = "Cable bacteria at oxygen-releasing roots of aquatic plants: a widespread and diverse plant-microbe association",
abstract = "Cable bacteria are sulfide-oxidizing, filamentous bacteria which reduce toxic sulfide levels, suppress methane emissions, and drive nutrient and carbon cycling in sediments. Recently, cable bacteria have been found associated with roots of aquatic plants and rice (Oryza sativa). However, the extent to which cable bacteria are associated with aquatic plants in nature remains unexplored. Using newly generated and public 16S rRNA gene sequence datasets combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization, we investigated the distribution of cable bacteria around the roots of aquatic plants, encompassing seagrass (including seagrass seedlings), rice, freshwater and saltmarsh plants. Diverse cable bacteria were found associated with roots of 16 out of 28 plant species and at 36 out of 55 investigated sites, across four continents. Plant associated cable bacteria were confirmed across a variety of ecosystems, including marine coastal environments, estuaries, freshwater streams, isolated pristine lakes and intensive agricultural systems. This pattern indicates that this plant-microbe relationship is globally widespread and neither obligate nor species-specific. The occurrence of cable bacteria in plant rhizospheres may be of general importance to vegetation vitality, primary productivity, coastal restoration practices and greenhouse gas balance of rice fields and wetlands.",
author = "Scholz, {Vincent V} and Martin, {Belinda C} and Ra{\"i}ssa Meyer and Andreas Schramm and Fraser, {Matthew W} and Nielsen, {Lars Peter} and Kendrick, {Gary A} and Nils Risgaard-Petersen and Burdorf, {Laurine D W} and Marshall, {Ian P G}",
note = "This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
year = "2021",
month = apr,
day = "23",
doi = "10.1111/nph.17415",
language = "English",
journal = "New Phytologist",
issn = "0028-646X",
publisher = "Academic Press",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cable bacteria at oxygen-releasing roots of aquatic plants: a widespread and diverse plant-microbe association

AU - Scholz, Vincent V

AU - Martin, Belinda C

AU - Meyer, Raïssa

AU - Schramm, Andreas

AU - Fraser, Matthew W

AU - Nielsen, Lars Peter

AU - Kendrick, Gary A

AU - Risgaard-Petersen, Nils

AU - Burdorf, Laurine D W

AU - Marshall, Ian P G

N1 - This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PY - 2021/4/23

Y1 - 2021/4/23

N2 - Cable bacteria are sulfide-oxidizing, filamentous bacteria which reduce toxic sulfide levels, suppress methane emissions, and drive nutrient and carbon cycling in sediments. Recently, cable bacteria have been found associated with roots of aquatic plants and rice (Oryza sativa). However, the extent to which cable bacteria are associated with aquatic plants in nature remains unexplored. Using newly generated and public 16S rRNA gene sequence datasets combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization, we investigated the distribution of cable bacteria around the roots of aquatic plants, encompassing seagrass (including seagrass seedlings), rice, freshwater and saltmarsh plants. Diverse cable bacteria were found associated with roots of 16 out of 28 plant species and at 36 out of 55 investigated sites, across four continents. Plant associated cable bacteria were confirmed across a variety of ecosystems, including marine coastal environments, estuaries, freshwater streams, isolated pristine lakes and intensive agricultural systems. This pattern indicates that this plant-microbe relationship is globally widespread and neither obligate nor species-specific. The occurrence of cable bacteria in plant rhizospheres may be of general importance to vegetation vitality, primary productivity, coastal restoration practices and greenhouse gas balance of rice fields and wetlands.

AB - Cable bacteria are sulfide-oxidizing, filamentous bacteria which reduce toxic sulfide levels, suppress methane emissions, and drive nutrient and carbon cycling in sediments. Recently, cable bacteria have been found associated with roots of aquatic plants and rice (Oryza sativa). However, the extent to which cable bacteria are associated with aquatic plants in nature remains unexplored. Using newly generated and public 16S rRNA gene sequence datasets combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization, we investigated the distribution of cable bacteria around the roots of aquatic plants, encompassing seagrass (including seagrass seedlings), rice, freshwater and saltmarsh plants. Diverse cable bacteria were found associated with roots of 16 out of 28 plant species and at 36 out of 55 investigated sites, across four continents. Plant associated cable bacteria were confirmed across a variety of ecosystems, including marine coastal environments, estuaries, freshwater streams, isolated pristine lakes and intensive agricultural systems. This pattern indicates that this plant-microbe relationship is globally widespread and neither obligate nor species-specific. The occurrence of cable bacteria in plant rhizospheres may be of general importance to vegetation vitality, primary productivity, coastal restoration practices and greenhouse gas balance of rice fields and wetlands.

U2 - 10.1111/nph.17415

DO - 10.1111/nph.17415

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33891715

JO - New Phytologist

JF - New Phytologist

SN - 0028-646X

ER -