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Assessing response to dry-off in dairy cows kept outdoors using spontaneous behaviours and infrared thermography—a pilot study

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Assessing response to dry-off in dairy cows kept outdoors using spontaneous behaviours and infrared thermography—a pilot study. / Amorim Franchi, Guilherme; Jensen, Margit Bak; Herskin, Mette S; McNeill, David; Phillips, Clive.

I: Tropical Animal Health and Production, Bind 53, Nr. 1, 46, 12.2021.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisKommentar/debat/letter to the editorForskningpeer review

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@article{cec368af8f9d4ab2bef4cb0f4de5ba91,
title = "Assessing response to dry-off in dairy cows kept outdoors using spontaneous behaviours and infrared thermography—a pilot study",
abstract = "We used spontaneous behaviours to assess response to dry-off involving abrupt dietary and milking frequency changes, followed by regrouping, after the last milking in 15 clinically healthy Holstein-Frisian cows kept outdoors. Moreover, we explored the potential of infrared thermography to detect eye temperature variations possibly induced by dry-off. On days − 1, 0, 1 and 2 relative to dry-off, we recorded whether cows vocalised during feed delivery; ate fresh feed within 5 min; and mean maximum eye temperature at approximately 1 h after feed delivery. On days 1 and 2, cows were more likely to eat fresh feed compared to days − 1 and 0. No difference in likelihood of vocalising was found. Compared to day − 1, eye temperature was substantially higher on days 0 and 2. Collectively, the results suggest that cows responded, both behaviourally and physiologically, to the abrupt dry-off management. The interpretation of the current findings deserves further investigation using larger sample sizes, more controlled environments and further behavioural, physiological, cognitive and clinical measures.",
keywords = "dry-off, dairy cow, welfare, feeding motivation, infrared thermography",
author = "{Amorim Franchi}, Guilherme and Jensen, {Margit Bak} and Herskin, {Mette S} and David McNeill and Clive Phillips",
year = "2021",
month = dec,
doi = "10.1007/s11250-020-02487-0",
language = "English",
volume = "53",
journal = "Tropical Animal Health and Production",
issn = "0049-4747",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Assessing response to dry-off in dairy cows kept outdoors using spontaneous behaviours and infrared thermography—a pilot study

AU - Amorim Franchi, Guilherme

AU - Jensen, Margit Bak

AU - Herskin, Mette S

AU - McNeill, David

AU - Phillips, Clive

PY - 2021/12

Y1 - 2021/12

N2 - We used spontaneous behaviours to assess response to dry-off involving abrupt dietary and milking frequency changes, followed by regrouping, after the last milking in 15 clinically healthy Holstein-Frisian cows kept outdoors. Moreover, we explored the potential of infrared thermography to detect eye temperature variations possibly induced by dry-off. On days − 1, 0, 1 and 2 relative to dry-off, we recorded whether cows vocalised during feed delivery; ate fresh feed within 5 min; and mean maximum eye temperature at approximately 1 h after feed delivery. On days 1 and 2, cows were more likely to eat fresh feed compared to days − 1 and 0. No difference in likelihood of vocalising was found. Compared to day − 1, eye temperature was substantially higher on days 0 and 2. Collectively, the results suggest that cows responded, both behaviourally and physiologically, to the abrupt dry-off management. The interpretation of the current findings deserves further investigation using larger sample sizes, more controlled environments and further behavioural, physiological, cognitive and clinical measures.

AB - We used spontaneous behaviours to assess response to dry-off involving abrupt dietary and milking frequency changes, followed by regrouping, after the last milking in 15 clinically healthy Holstein-Frisian cows kept outdoors. Moreover, we explored the potential of infrared thermography to detect eye temperature variations possibly induced by dry-off. On days − 1, 0, 1 and 2 relative to dry-off, we recorded whether cows vocalised during feed delivery; ate fresh feed within 5 min; and mean maximum eye temperature at approximately 1 h after feed delivery. On days 1 and 2, cows were more likely to eat fresh feed compared to days − 1 and 0. No difference in likelihood of vocalising was found. Compared to day − 1, eye temperature was substantially higher on days 0 and 2. Collectively, the results suggest that cows responded, both behaviourally and physiologically, to the abrupt dry-off management. The interpretation of the current findings deserves further investigation using larger sample sizes, more controlled environments and further behavioural, physiological, cognitive and clinical measures.

KW - dry-off

KW - dairy cow

KW - welfare

KW - feeding motivation

KW - infrared thermography

U2 - 10.1007/s11250-020-02487-0

DO - 10.1007/s11250-020-02487-0

M3 - Comment/debate/letter to the editor

C2 - 33241458

VL - 53

JO - Tropical Animal Health and Production

JF - Tropical Animal Health and Production

SN - 0049-4747

IS - 1

M1 - 46

ER -