Assessing Representation and Perceived Inclusion among Members of the Society for Epidemiologic Research

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  • Elizabeth A DeVilbiss, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland., USA
  • Jennifer Weuve, Boston University School of Public Health, USA
  • David S Fink, Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, USA
  • Meghan D Morris, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California., USA
  • Onyebuchi A Arah
  • Jeannie G Radoc, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland., USA
  • Geetanjali D Datta, Health Innovation and Evaluation Hub, CHUM Research Centre, Montreal, Canada
  • Nadia N Abuelezam, Boston College, USA
  • David S Lopez, Department of Preventative Medicine and Community Health, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, USA
  • Dayna A Johnson, Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA
  • Charles C Branas, Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, USA
  • Enrique F Schisterman, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland., USA

Using Web-based survey data collected in June-August 2018 from members of the Society for Epidemiologic Research (SER), we characterized numerous dimensions of social identity and lived experience and assessed relationships between these characteristics and perceptions of inclusion and Society participation. We quantified associations between those characteristics and 3 outcomes: feeling very welcomed, high (top 25th percentile) self-initiated participation, and any (top 10th percentile) Society-initiated participation. Data for racial/ethnic and religious minority categories were blinded to preserve anonymity, and we accounted for missing data. In 2018, most SER members (n = 1,631) were White (62%) or female (66%). Females with racial/ethnic nonresponse were least likely to report feeling very welcomed, while White males were most likely. Members who did not report their race, identified with a specific racial/ethnic minority, or were politically conservative/right-leaning were less likely than White or liberal/left-leaning members to have high self-initiated participation. Women and persons of specific racial/ethnic minority or minority religious affiliations were less likely to participate in events initiated by the Society. These data represent a baseline for assessing trends and the impact of future initiatives aimed at improving diversity, inclusion, representation, and participation within SER.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Vol/bind189
Nummer10
Sider (fra-til)998-1010
Antal sider13
ISSN0002-9262
DOI
StatusUdgivet - okt. 2020

Bibliografisk note

Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 2020.

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