Assembly and structural analysis of a covalently closed nano-scale DNA cage

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Dokumenter

DOI

  • Félicie Faucon Andersen, Danmark
  • Bjarne Knudsen, CLC bio A/S, Danmark
  • Cristiano Luis Pinto De Oliveira, Department of Chemistry and Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), University of Aarhus, Danmark
  • Rikke Frøhlich Hougaard
  • Dinna Krüger, Danmark
  • Jörg Bungert, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, USA
  • Mavis Agbandje-McKenna, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, USA
  • Robert McKenna, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, USA
  • Sissel Juul Jensen, Danmark
  • Christopher Veigaard
  • Jørn Koch, Department of Pathology, Aarhus Sygehus, Danmark
  • John L Rubinstein, Molecular Structure and Function Program, Research Institute, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Bernt Guldbrandtsen
  • Marianne Smedegaard Hede, Danmark
  • Göran Karlsson, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Div. of Physical Chemistry, Uppsala University, Sverige
  • Anni Hangaard Andersen
  • Jan Skov Pedersen, Department of Chemistry and Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), University of Aarhus, Danmark
  • Birgitta R. Knudsen
The inherent properties of DNA as a stable polymer with unique affinity for partner molecules determined by the specific Watson-Crick base pairing makes it an ideal component in self-assembling structures. This has been exploited for decades in the design of a variety of artificial substrates for investigations of DNA-interacting enzymes. More recently, strategies for synthesis of more complex two-dimensional (2D) and 3D DNA structures have emerged. However, the building of such structures is still in progress and more experiences from different research groups and different fields of expertise are necessary before complex DNA structures can be routinely designed for the use in basal science and/or biotechnology. Here we present the design, construction and structural analysis of a covalently closed and stable 3D DNA structure with the connectivity of an octahedron, as defined by the double-stranded DNA helices that assembles from eight oligonucleotides with a yield of ~30%. As demonstrated by Small Angle X-ray Scattering and cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy analyses the eight-stranded DNA structure has a central cavity larger than the apertures in the surrounding DNA lattice and can be described as a nano-scale DNA cage, Hence, in theory it could hold proteins or other bio-molecules to enable their investigation in certain harmful environments or even allow their organization into higher order structures
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftNucleic Acids Research
Vol/bind36
Nummer4
Sider (fra-til)1113-1119
Antal sider7
ISSN0305-1048
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2008

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