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Art, climate change and (other) eco materials: rethinking the cosmopolitanization of aesthetics and the aesthetics of cosmopolitanization with Ulrich Beck

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Art, climate change and (other) eco materials : rethinking the cosmopolitanization of aesthetics and the aesthetics of cosmopolitanization with Ulrich Beck. / Thorsen, Line Marie.

I: Global Networks, Bind 20, Nr. 3, 2020, s. 564-583.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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@article{a100bfd5eefc42059f1869830519e0e5,
title = "Art, climate change and (other) eco materials: rethinking the cosmopolitanization of aesthetics and the aesthetics of cosmopolitanization with Ulrich Beck",
abstract = "Based on fieldwork in Japan and Hong Kong, I ask how methodological cosmopolitanism, as formulated by Ulrich Beck, may afford new and highly needed modes for grappling with climatically concerned art and aesthetic practices across geographical regions. I will argue that methodological cosmopolitanism serves as an important framework for approaching such art practices, and suggest that two overall intertwined strands concerning aesthetic practices engaged in global issues of climate change, emerge from this – the cosmopolitanization of aesthetics and, reversely, the aesthetics of cosmopolitanization. Departing from my fieldwork among farming artists in the Hong Kong countryside and in the Japanese satoyama – rural mountain – areas, I will, on the one hand, argue that art practices are {\textquoteleft}cosmopolitanized{\textquoteright} by the awareness of global risks, manifested in anticipation of the comprehensive climatic changes (in)discriminately affecting across nations and regions. At the same time, and importantly, art practices are actively attending to this {\textquoteleft}risky{\textquoteright} cosmopolitanization, giving aesthetic voice, form and {\textquoteleft}visuality{\textquoteright} to unfolding climatic issues and concerns and hereby practising what I will call an {\textquoteleft}aesthetics of cosmopolitanization{\textquoteright}.",
keywords = "AESTHETIC PRACTICES, CLIMATE CHANGE, COSMOPOLITANIZATION, HONG KONG, JAPAN, METHODOLOGICAL COSMOPOLITANISM",
author = "Thorsen, {Line Marie}",
year = "2020",
doi = "10.1111/glob.12278",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "564--583",
journal = "Global Networks: A Journal of Transnational Affairs",
issn = "1470-2266",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Art, climate change and (other) eco materials

T2 - rethinking the cosmopolitanization of aesthetics and the aesthetics of cosmopolitanization with Ulrich Beck

AU - Thorsen, Line Marie

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - Based on fieldwork in Japan and Hong Kong, I ask how methodological cosmopolitanism, as formulated by Ulrich Beck, may afford new and highly needed modes for grappling with climatically concerned art and aesthetic practices across geographical regions. I will argue that methodological cosmopolitanism serves as an important framework for approaching such art practices, and suggest that two overall intertwined strands concerning aesthetic practices engaged in global issues of climate change, emerge from this – the cosmopolitanization of aesthetics and, reversely, the aesthetics of cosmopolitanization. Departing from my fieldwork among farming artists in the Hong Kong countryside and in the Japanese satoyama – rural mountain – areas, I will, on the one hand, argue that art practices are ‘cosmopolitanized’ by the awareness of global risks, manifested in anticipation of the comprehensive climatic changes (in)discriminately affecting across nations and regions. At the same time, and importantly, art practices are actively attending to this ‘risky’ cosmopolitanization, giving aesthetic voice, form and ‘visuality’ to unfolding climatic issues and concerns and hereby practising what I will call an ‘aesthetics of cosmopolitanization’.

AB - Based on fieldwork in Japan and Hong Kong, I ask how methodological cosmopolitanism, as formulated by Ulrich Beck, may afford new and highly needed modes for grappling with climatically concerned art and aesthetic practices across geographical regions. I will argue that methodological cosmopolitanism serves as an important framework for approaching such art practices, and suggest that two overall intertwined strands concerning aesthetic practices engaged in global issues of climate change, emerge from this – the cosmopolitanization of aesthetics and, reversely, the aesthetics of cosmopolitanization. Departing from my fieldwork among farming artists in the Hong Kong countryside and in the Japanese satoyama – rural mountain – areas, I will, on the one hand, argue that art practices are ‘cosmopolitanized’ by the awareness of global risks, manifested in anticipation of the comprehensive climatic changes (in)discriminately affecting across nations and regions. At the same time, and importantly, art practices are actively attending to this ‘risky’ cosmopolitanization, giving aesthetic voice, form and ‘visuality’ to unfolding climatic issues and concerns and hereby practising what I will call an ‘aesthetics of cosmopolitanization’.

KW - AESTHETIC PRACTICES

KW - CLIMATE CHANGE

KW - COSMOPOLITANIZATION

KW - HONG KONG

KW - JAPAN

KW - METHODOLOGICAL COSMOPOLITANISM

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85079033492&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/glob.12278

DO - 10.1111/glob.12278

M3 - Journal article

AN - SCOPUS:85079033492

VL - 20

SP - 564

EP - 583

JO - Global Networks: A Journal of Transnational Affairs

JF - Global Networks: A Journal of Transnational Affairs

SN - 1470-2266

IS - 3

ER -