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A systematic review of motivations, enablers and barriers for consumer engagement with residential demand response

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A systematic review of motivations, enablers and barriers for consumer engagement with residential demand response. / Parrish, Bryony; Heptonstall, Phil; Gross, Rob et al.

I: Energy Policy, Bind 138, 111221, 03.2020.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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Parrish, Bryony ; Heptonstall, Phil ; Gross, Rob et al. / A systematic review of motivations, enablers and barriers for consumer engagement with residential demand response. I: Energy Policy. 2020 ; Bind 138.

Bibtex

@article{6ff5c564e1714f2796d3942a5981fb4c,
title = "A systematic review of motivations, enablers and barriers for consumer engagement with residential demand response",
abstract = "Demand response is increasingly attracting policy attention. It involves changing electricity demand at different times based on grid conditions, which could help to integrate variable renewable generation and new electric loads associated with decarbonisation. Residential consumers could offer a substantial new source of demand-side flexibility. However, while there is considerable evidence that at least some residential users engage with at least some forms of demand response, there is also considerable variation in user engagement. Better understanding this variation could help to predict demand response potential, and to engage and protect consumers participating in demand response. Based on a systematic review of international demand response trials, programmes and surveys, we identify motivations for participation, and barriers and enablers to engagement including familiarity and trust, perceived risk and control, complexity and effort, and consumer characteristics and routines. We then discuss how these factors relate to the features of different demand response products and services. While the complexity of the evidence makes it difficult to draw unequivocal conclusions, the findings of this review could contribute to guide early efforts to deploy residential demand response more widely.",
keywords = "Consumer engagement, Demand response, Demand-side management, Flexibility, Residential",
author = "Bryony Parrish and Phil Heptonstall and Rob Gross and Sovacool, {Benjamin K.}",
year = "2020",
month = mar,
doi = "10.1016/j.enpol.2019.111221",
language = "English",
volume = "138",
journal = "Energy Policy",
issn = "0301-4215",
publisher = "Elsevier Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A systematic review of motivations, enablers and barriers for consumer engagement with residential demand response

AU - Parrish, Bryony

AU - Heptonstall, Phil

AU - Gross, Rob

AU - Sovacool, Benjamin K.

PY - 2020/3

Y1 - 2020/3

N2 - Demand response is increasingly attracting policy attention. It involves changing electricity demand at different times based on grid conditions, which could help to integrate variable renewable generation and new electric loads associated with decarbonisation. Residential consumers could offer a substantial new source of demand-side flexibility. However, while there is considerable evidence that at least some residential users engage with at least some forms of demand response, there is also considerable variation in user engagement. Better understanding this variation could help to predict demand response potential, and to engage and protect consumers participating in demand response. Based on a systematic review of international demand response trials, programmes and surveys, we identify motivations for participation, and barriers and enablers to engagement including familiarity and trust, perceived risk and control, complexity and effort, and consumer characteristics and routines. We then discuss how these factors relate to the features of different demand response products and services. While the complexity of the evidence makes it difficult to draw unequivocal conclusions, the findings of this review could contribute to guide early efforts to deploy residential demand response more widely.

AB - Demand response is increasingly attracting policy attention. It involves changing electricity demand at different times based on grid conditions, which could help to integrate variable renewable generation and new electric loads associated with decarbonisation. Residential consumers could offer a substantial new source of demand-side flexibility. However, while there is considerable evidence that at least some residential users engage with at least some forms of demand response, there is also considerable variation in user engagement. Better understanding this variation could help to predict demand response potential, and to engage and protect consumers participating in demand response. Based on a systematic review of international demand response trials, programmes and surveys, we identify motivations for participation, and barriers and enablers to engagement including familiarity and trust, perceived risk and control, complexity and effort, and consumer characteristics and routines. We then discuss how these factors relate to the features of different demand response products and services. While the complexity of the evidence makes it difficult to draw unequivocal conclusions, the findings of this review could contribute to guide early efforts to deploy residential demand response more widely.

KW - Consumer engagement

KW - Demand response

KW - Demand-side management

KW - Flexibility

KW - Residential

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85077922732&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.enpol.2019.111221

DO - 10.1016/j.enpol.2019.111221

M3 - Journal article

AN - SCOPUS:85077922732

VL - 138

JO - Energy Policy

JF - Energy Policy

SN - 0301-4215

M1 - 111221

ER -