A Soul by Any Other Name: The Name-Soul Concept in Circumpolar Perspective

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A Soul by Any Other Name : The Name-Soul Concept in Circumpolar Perspective. / Walsh, Matthew J.; O’Neill, Sean; Riede, Felix; Willerslev, Rane.

I: Cross-Cultural Research, Bind 53, Nr. 3, 2018, s. 312-349.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

Walsh, MJ, O’Neill, S, Riede, F & Willerslev, R 2018, 'A Soul by Any Other Name: The Name-Soul Concept in Circumpolar Perspective', Cross-Cultural Research, bind 53, nr. 3, s. 312-349. https://doi.org/10.1177/1069397118813078

APA

Walsh, M. J., O’Neill, S., Riede, F., & Willerslev, R. (2018). A Soul by Any Other Name: The Name-Soul Concept in Circumpolar Perspective. Cross-Cultural Research, 53(3), 312-349. https://doi.org/10.1177/1069397118813078

CBE

Walsh MJ, O’Neill S, Riede F, Willerslev R. 2018. A Soul by Any Other Name: The Name-Soul Concept in Circumpolar Perspective. Cross-Cultural Research. 53(3):312-349. https://doi.org/10.1177/1069397118813078

MLA

Vancouver

Walsh MJ, O’Neill S, Riede F, Willerslev R. A Soul by Any Other Name: The Name-Soul Concept in Circumpolar Perspective. Cross-Cultural Research. 2018;53(3):312-349. https://doi.org/10.1177/1069397118813078

Author

Walsh, Matthew J. ; O’Neill, Sean ; Riede, Felix ; Willerslev, Rane. / A Soul by Any Other Name : The Name-Soul Concept in Circumpolar Perspective. I: Cross-Cultural Research. 2018 ; Bind 53, Nr. 3. s. 312-349.

Bibtex

@article{71ad68de85664783bf742afc3dd92a53,
title = "A Soul by Any Other Name: The Name-Soul Concept in Circumpolar Perspective",
abstract = "Name-soul beliefs maintain that, through a process of reincarnation, spirits of the deceased return into the bodies of newborn members of the same society. When this is recognized, the newborn or very young child is then named for the previously known ancestor or close kin relation believed to be returning (e.g., a grandfather, or an aunt). Name-soul spiritual beliefs among traditional indigenous societies residing in circumpolar regions are pervasive. These correlate with livelihoods earned through hunting, gathering, and fishing in freezing cold expanses of extreme landscape, presenting great physical challenges for traditional families over many generations. A neo-functionalist argument is proposed here, with two aspects. First, that kin ties are strongly reinforced between generations through this close association of affinity and identity, providing important emotional bonds that vitally facilitate physical survival. Second, that the sharpened spiritual power of a soul with the wherewithal to journey back offered powerful protection to the young. Drawing on detailed readings of qualitative ethnographic literature on 11 discrete societies across the region as evidence, this article compares and contrasts name-soul beliefs to better understand the extent to which very similar beliefs might have emerged independently of each other, and how these might have solved similar problems.",
author = "Walsh, {Matthew J.} and Sean O{\textquoteright}Neill and Felix Riede and Rane Willerslev",
note = "<p>doi: 10.1177/1069397118813078</p>; null ; Conference date: 24-09-2015 Through 25-09-2015",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1177/1069397118813078",
language = "English",
volume = "53",
pages = "312--349",
journal = "Cross-Cultural Research",
issn = "1069-3971",
publisher = "Sage Publications, Inc.",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A Soul by Any Other Name

AU - Walsh, Matthew J.

AU - O’Neill, Sean

AU - Riede, Felix

AU - Willerslev, Rane

N1 - <p>doi: 10.1177/1069397118813078</p>

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Name-soul beliefs maintain that, through a process of reincarnation, spirits of the deceased return into the bodies of newborn members of the same society. When this is recognized, the newborn or very young child is then named for the previously known ancestor or close kin relation believed to be returning (e.g., a grandfather, or an aunt). Name-soul spiritual beliefs among traditional indigenous societies residing in circumpolar regions are pervasive. These correlate with livelihoods earned through hunting, gathering, and fishing in freezing cold expanses of extreme landscape, presenting great physical challenges for traditional families over many generations. A neo-functionalist argument is proposed here, with two aspects. First, that kin ties are strongly reinforced between generations through this close association of affinity and identity, providing important emotional bonds that vitally facilitate physical survival. Second, that the sharpened spiritual power of a soul with the wherewithal to journey back offered powerful protection to the young. Drawing on detailed readings of qualitative ethnographic literature on 11 discrete societies across the region as evidence, this article compares and contrasts name-soul beliefs to better understand the extent to which very similar beliefs might have emerged independently of each other, and how these might have solved similar problems.

AB - Name-soul beliefs maintain that, through a process of reincarnation, spirits of the deceased return into the bodies of newborn members of the same society. When this is recognized, the newborn or very young child is then named for the previously known ancestor or close kin relation believed to be returning (e.g., a grandfather, or an aunt). Name-soul spiritual beliefs among traditional indigenous societies residing in circumpolar regions are pervasive. These correlate with livelihoods earned through hunting, gathering, and fishing in freezing cold expanses of extreme landscape, presenting great physical challenges for traditional families over many generations. A neo-functionalist argument is proposed here, with two aspects. First, that kin ties are strongly reinforced between generations through this close association of affinity and identity, providing important emotional bonds that vitally facilitate physical survival. Second, that the sharpened spiritual power of a soul with the wherewithal to journey back offered powerful protection to the young. Drawing on detailed readings of qualitative ethnographic literature on 11 discrete societies across the region as evidence, this article compares and contrasts name-soul beliefs to better understand the extent to which very similar beliefs might have emerged independently of each other, and how these might have solved similar problems.

U2 - 10.1177/1069397118813078

DO - 10.1177/1069397118813078

M3 - Journal article

VL - 53

SP - 312

EP - 349

JO - Cross-Cultural Research

JF - Cross-Cultural Research

SN - 1069-3971

IS - 3

Y2 - 24 September 2015 through 25 September 2015

ER -