A cross-continental analysis of weight gain, psychiatric diagnoses and medication use during inpatient psychiatric treatment. The international study on physical illness in mentally ill

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  • Christina Engelke, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf
  • ,
  • Christian Lange-Asschenfeldt, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf
  • ,
  • Stephanie Peter, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf
  • ,
  • Kai G. Kahl, Hannover Medical School
  • ,
  • Karel Frasch, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics in the Donau-Ries Hospital
  • ,
  • Jens I. Larsen, Aalborg University
  • ,
  • Graziella G. Bickel, Cantonal Hospital
  • ,
  • Bernhard Bork, Psychiatric Hospital
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  • Bent A. Jacobsen, Aalborg University
  • ,
  • Signe O. Wallenstein-Jensen
  • Christoph Lauber, Services Psychiatriques
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  • Birthe Mogensen, Psychiatric Hospital Slagelse
  • ,
  • Jørgen A. Nielsen
  • ,
  • Wulf Rössler, Psychiatric University Hospital
  • ,
  • Kenji J. Tsuchiya, Hamamatsu School of Medicine
  • ,
  • Kristian L. Toftegaard
  • ,
  • Ulla A. Andersen, Odense Universitetshospital
  • ,
  • Richard Uwakwe, Nnamdi Azikiwe University
  • ,
  • Povl Munk-Jørgensen, Odense Universitetshospital
  • ,
  • Joachim Cordes, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf

Weight gain among psychiatric inpatients is a widespread phenomenon. This change in body mass index (BMI) can be caused by several factors. Based on recent research, we assume the following factors are related to weight gain during psychiatric inpatient treatment: psychiatric medication, psychiatric diagnosis, sex, age, weight on admission and geographic region of treatment. 876 of originally recruited 2328 patients met the criteria for our analysis. Patients were recruited and examined in mental health care centres in Nigeria (N = 265), Japan (N = 145) and Western-Europe (Denmark, Germany and Switzerland; N = 466). There was a significant effect of psychiatric medication, psychiatric diagnoses and geographic region, but not age and sex, on BMI changes. Geographic region had a significant effect on BMI change, with Nigerian patients gaining significantly more weight than Japanese and Western European patients. Moreover, geographic region influenced the type of psychiatric medication prescribed and the psychiatric diagnoses. The diagnoses and psychiatric medication prescribed had a significant effect on BMI change. In conclusion, we consider weight gain as a multifactorial phenomenon that is influenced by several factors. One can discuss a number of explanations for our findings, such as different clinical practices in the geographical regions (prescribing or admission strategies and access-to-care aspects), as well as socio-economic and cultural differences.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEuropean Psychiatry
Vol/bind48
Sider (fra-til)65-70
Antal sider6
ISSN0924-9338
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1 feb. 2018

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