A Complement C3-Specific Nanobody for Modulation of the Alternative Cascade Identifies the C-Terminal Domain of C3b as Functional in C5 Convertase Activity

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DOI

  • Henrik Pedersen
  • Rasmus K Jensen
  • Jens Magnus B Jensen, Molecular Diagnostic Laboratory, Departments of Clinical Biochemistry, Aarhus University Hospital, DK 8200 Skejby, Aarhus, Denmark
  • ,
  • Rachel Fox, Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT
  • ,
  • Dennis V Pedersen, 1] Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University, Aarhus C DK-8000, Denmark [2] Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, Aarhus C DK-8000, Denmark.
  • ,
  • Heidi G Olesen
  • Annette G Hansen
  • Dorte Christiansen, Nordland Hospital
  • ,
  • Sofia M M Mazarakis
  • Neal Lojek, Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT
  • ,
  • Pernille Hansen
  • Trine A F Gadeberg
  • Alessandra Zarantonello
  • Nick S Laursen
  • Tom Eirik Mollnes, Nordland Hospital, University of Tromsø, University of Oslo, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
  • ,
  • Matthew B Johnson, Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Boston Children's Hospital
  • ,
  • Beth Stevens, Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Boston Children's Hospital
  • ,
  • Steffen Thiel
  • Gregers R Andersen

The complement system is an intricate cascade of the innate immune system and plays a key role in microbial defense, inflammation, organ development, and tissue regeneration. There is increasing interest in developing complement regulatory and inhibitory agents to treat complement dysfunction. In this study, we describe the nanobody hC3Nb3, which is specific for the C-terminal C345c domain of human and mouse complement component C3/C3b/C3c and potently inhibits C3 cleavage by the alternative pathway. A high-resolution structure of the hC3Nb3-C345c complex explains how the nanobody blocks proconvertase assembly. Surprisingly, although the nanobody does not affect classical pathway-mediated C3 cleavage, hC3Nb3 inhibits classical pathway-driven hemolysis, suggesting that the C-terminal domain of C3b has an important function in classical pathway C5 convertase activity. The hC3Nb3 nanobody binds C3 with low nanomolar affinity in an SDS-resistant complex, and the nanobody is demonstrated to be a powerful reagent for C3 detection in immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. Overall, the hC3Nb3 nanobody represents a potent inhibitor of both the alternative pathway and the terminal pathway, with possible applications in complement research, diagnostics, and therapeutics.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Immunology
Vol/bind205
Nummer8
Antal sider15
ISSN0022-1767
DOI
StatusUdgivet - okt. 2020

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Copyright © 2020 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

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