A case study for late Archean and Proterozoic biogeochemical iron- and sulphur cycling in a modern habitatthe Arvadi Spring

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Standard

A case study for late Archean and Proterozoic biogeochemical iron- and sulphur cycling in a modern habitatthe Arvadi Spring. / Koeksoy, Elif; Halama, Maximilian; Hagemann, Nikolas; Weigold, Pascal R.; Laufer, Katja; Kleindienst, Sara; Byrne, James M.; Sundman, Anneli; Hanselmann, Kurt; Halevy, Itay; Schoenberg, Ronny; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Kappler, Andreas.

I: Geobiology, Bind 16, Nr. 4, 07.2018, s. 353-368.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

Koeksoy, E, Halama, M, Hagemann, N, Weigold, PR, Laufer, K, Kleindienst, S, Byrne, JM, Sundman, A, Hanselmann, K, Halevy, I, Schoenberg, R, Konhauser, KO & Kappler, A 2018, 'A case study for late Archean and Proterozoic biogeochemical iron- and sulphur cycling in a modern habitatthe Arvadi Spring', Geobiology, bind 16, nr. 4, s. 353-368. https://doi.org/10.1111/gbi.12293

APA

Koeksoy, E., Halama, M., Hagemann, N., Weigold, P. R., Laufer, K., Kleindienst, S., Byrne, J. M., Sundman, A., Hanselmann, K., Halevy, I., Schoenberg, R., Konhauser, K. O., & Kappler, A. (2018). A case study for late Archean and Proterozoic biogeochemical iron- and sulphur cycling in a modern habitatthe Arvadi Spring. Geobiology, 16(4), 353-368. https://doi.org/10.1111/gbi.12293

CBE

Koeksoy E, Halama M, Hagemann N, Weigold PR, Laufer K, Kleindienst S, Byrne JM, Sundman A, Hanselmann K, Halevy I, Schoenberg R, Konhauser KO, Kappler A. 2018. A case study for late Archean and Proterozoic biogeochemical iron- and sulphur cycling in a modern habitatthe Arvadi Spring. Geobiology. 16(4):353-368. https://doi.org/10.1111/gbi.12293

MLA

Vancouver

Koeksoy E, Halama M, Hagemann N, Weigold PR, Laufer K, Kleindienst S o.a. A case study for late Archean and Proterozoic biogeochemical iron- and sulphur cycling in a modern habitatthe Arvadi Spring. Geobiology. 2018 jul;16(4):353-368. https://doi.org/10.1111/gbi.12293

Author

Koeksoy, Elif ; Halama, Maximilian ; Hagemann, Nikolas ; Weigold, Pascal R. ; Laufer, Katja ; Kleindienst, Sara ; Byrne, James M. ; Sundman, Anneli ; Hanselmann, Kurt ; Halevy, Itay ; Schoenberg, Ronny ; Konhauser, Kurt O. ; Kappler, Andreas. / A case study for late Archean and Proterozoic biogeochemical iron- and sulphur cycling in a modern habitatthe Arvadi Spring. I: Geobiology. 2018 ; Bind 16, Nr. 4. s. 353-368.

Bibtex

@article{fcaff671657c4f85b4a7d539b74a53f2,
title = "A case study for late Archean and Proterozoic biogeochemical iron- and sulphur cycling in a modern habitatthe Arvadi Spring",
abstract = "As a consequence of Earth's surface oxygenation, ocean geochemistry changed from ferruginous (iron(II)-rich) into more complex ferro-euxinic (iron(II)-sulphide-rich) conditions during the Paleoproterozoic. This transition must have had profound implications for the Proterozoic microbial community that existed within the ocean water and bottom sediment; in particular, iron-oxidizing bacteria likely had to compete with emerging sulphur-metabolizers. However, the nature of their coexistence and interaction remains speculative. Here, we present geochemical and microbiological data from the Arvadi Spring in the eastern Swiss Alps, a modern model habitat for ferro-euxinic transition zones in late Archean and Proterozoic oceans during high-oxygen intervals, which enables us to reconstruct the microbial community structure in respective settings for this geological era. The spring water is oxygen-saturated but still contains relatively elevated concentrations of dissolved iron(II) (17.2 +/- 2.8M) and sulphide (2.5 +/- 0.2M) with simultaneously high concentrations of sulphate (8.3 +/- 0.04mM). Solids consisting of quartz, calcite, dolomite and iron(III) oxyhydroxide minerals as well as sulphur-containing particles, presumably elemental S-0, cover the spring sediment. Cultivation-based most probable number counts revealed microaerophilic iron(II)-oxidizers and sulphide-oxidizers to represent the largest fraction of iron- and sulphur-metabolizers in the spring, coexisting with less abundant iron(III)-reducers, sulphate-reducers and phototrophic and nitrate-reducing iron(II)-oxidizers. 16S rRNA gene 454 pyrosequencing showed sulphide-oxidizing Thiothrix species to be the dominating genus, supporting the results from our cultivation-based assessment. Collectively, our results suggest that anaerobic and microaerophilic iron- and sulphur-metabolizers could have coexisted in oxygenated ferro-sulphidic transition zones of late Archean and Proterozoic oceans, where they would have sustained continuous cycling of iron and sulphur compounds.",
keywords = "Fe-S cycles, Fe-S microbial community, mineralized alpine spring, BILLION YEARS AGO, NATURAL-WATERS, OCEAN ANALOG, MOSSBAUER-SPECTROSCOPY, FERRUGINOUS CONDITIONS, ATMOSPHERIC OXYGEN, PRECAMBRIAN OCEANS, HYDROGEN-SULFIDE, FE-II, OXIDATION",
author = "Elif Koeksoy and Maximilian Halama and Nikolas Hagemann and Weigold, {Pascal R.} and Katja Laufer and Sara Kleindienst and Byrne, {James M.} and Anneli Sundman and Kurt Hanselmann and Itay Halevy and Ronny Schoenberg and Konhauser, {Kurt O.} and Andreas Kappler",
year = "2018",
month = jul,
doi = "10.1111/gbi.12293",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "353--368",
journal = "Geobiology",
issn = "1472-4677",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A case study for late Archean and Proterozoic biogeochemical iron- and sulphur cycling in a modern habitatthe Arvadi Spring

AU - Koeksoy, Elif

AU - Halama, Maximilian

AU - Hagemann, Nikolas

AU - Weigold, Pascal R.

AU - Laufer, Katja

AU - Kleindienst, Sara

AU - Byrne, James M.

AU - Sundman, Anneli

AU - Hanselmann, Kurt

AU - Halevy, Itay

AU - Schoenberg, Ronny

AU - Konhauser, Kurt O.

AU - Kappler, Andreas

PY - 2018/7

Y1 - 2018/7

N2 - As a consequence of Earth's surface oxygenation, ocean geochemistry changed from ferruginous (iron(II)-rich) into more complex ferro-euxinic (iron(II)-sulphide-rich) conditions during the Paleoproterozoic. This transition must have had profound implications for the Proterozoic microbial community that existed within the ocean water and bottom sediment; in particular, iron-oxidizing bacteria likely had to compete with emerging sulphur-metabolizers. However, the nature of their coexistence and interaction remains speculative. Here, we present geochemical and microbiological data from the Arvadi Spring in the eastern Swiss Alps, a modern model habitat for ferro-euxinic transition zones in late Archean and Proterozoic oceans during high-oxygen intervals, which enables us to reconstruct the microbial community structure in respective settings for this geological era. The spring water is oxygen-saturated but still contains relatively elevated concentrations of dissolved iron(II) (17.2 +/- 2.8M) and sulphide (2.5 +/- 0.2M) with simultaneously high concentrations of sulphate (8.3 +/- 0.04mM). Solids consisting of quartz, calcite, dolomite and iron(III) oxyhydroxide minerals as well as sulphur-containing particles, presumably elemental S-0, cover the spring sediment. Cultivation-based most probable number counts revealed microaerophilic iron(II)-oxidizers and sulphide-oxidizers to represent the largest fraction of iron- and sulphur-metabolizers in the spring, coexisting with less abundant iron(III)-reducers, sulphate-reducers and phototrophic and nitrate-reducing iron(II)-oxidizers. 16S rRNA gene 454 pyrosequencing showed sulphide-oxidizing Thiothrix species to be the dominating genus, supporting the results from our cultivation-based assessment. Collectively, our results suggest that anaerobic and microaerophilic iron- and sulphur-metabolizers could have coexisted in oxygenated ferro-sulphidic transition zones of late Archean and Proterozoic oceans, where they would have sustained continuous cycling of iron and sulphur compounds.

AB - As a consequence of Earth's surface oxygenation, ocean geochemistry changed from ferruginous (iron(II)-rich) into more complex ferro-euxinic (iron(II)-sulphide-rich) conditions during the Paleoproterozoic. This transition must have had profound implications for the Proterozoic microbial community that existed within the ocean water and bottom sediment; in particular, iron-oxidizing bacteria likely had to compete with emerging sulphur-metabolizers. However, the nature of their coexistence and interaction remains speculative. Here, we present geochemical and microbiological data from the Arvadi Spring in the eastern Swiss Alps, a modern model habitat for ferro-euxinic transition zones in late Archean and Proterozoic oceans during high-oxygen intervals, which enables us to reconstruct the microbial community structure in respective settings for this geological era. The spring water is oxygen-saturated but still contains relatively elevated concentrations of dissolved iron(II) (17.2 +/- 2.8M) and sulphide (2.5 +/- 0.2M) with simultaneously high concentrations of sulphate (8.3 +/- 0.04mM). Solids consisting of quartz, calcite, dolomite and iron(III) oxyhydroxide minerals as well as sulphur-containing particles, presumably elemental S-0, cover the spring sediment. Cultivation-based most probable number counts revealed microaerophilic iron(II)-oxidizers and sulphide-oxidizers to represent the largest fraction of iron- and sulphur-metabolizers in the spring, coexisting with less abundant iron(III)-reducers, sulphate-reducers and phototrophic and nitrate-reducing iron(II)-oxidizers. 16S rRNA gene 454 pyrosequencing showed sulphide-oxidizing Thiothrix species to be the dominating genus, supporting the results from our cultivation-based assessment. Collectively, our results suggest that anaerobic and microaerophilic iron- and sulphur-metabolizers could have coexisted in oxygenated ferro-sulphidic transition zones of late Archean and Proterozoic oceans, where they would have sustained continuous cycling of iron and sulphur compounds.

KW - Fe-S cycles

KW - Fe-S microbial community

KW - mineralized alpine spring

KW - BILLION YEARS AGO

KW - NATURAL-WATERS

KW - OCEAN ANALOG

KW - MOSSBAUER-SPECTROSCOPY

KW - FERRUGINOUS CONDITIONS

KW - ATMOSPHERIC OXYGEN

KW - PRECAMBRIAN OCEANS

KW - HYDROGEN-SULFIDE

KW - FE-II

KW - OXIDATION

U2 - 10.1111/gbi.12293

DO - 10.1111/gbi.12293

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 29885273

VL - 16

SP - 353

EP - 368

JO - Geobiology

JF - Geobiology

SN - 1472-4677

IS - 4

ER -