Torben Sigsgaard

Self-reported exposure to traffic pollution in relation to daytime sleepiness and habitual snoring: a questionnaire study in seven North-European cities

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DOI

  • Thorarinn Gislason, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland; Department of Respiratory Medicine and Sleep, Landspitali - National University Hospital of Iceland, Iceland.
  • ,
  • Randi J Bertelsen, Department of Occupational Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
  • ,
  • Francisco Gomez Real, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
  • ,
  • Torben Sigsgaard
  • Karl A Franklin, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
  • ,
  • Eva Lindberg, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory-, Allergy and Sleep Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
  • ,
  • Christer Janson, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory-, Allergy and Sleep Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
  • ,
  • Erna Sif Arnardottir, Department of Respiratory Medicine and Sleep, Landspitali, The National University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland ; Faculty of Medicine, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
  • ,
  • Johan Hellgren, University of Gothenburg
  • ,
  • Bryndis Benediktsdottir, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland; Department of Respiratory Medicine and Sleep, Landspitali - National University Hospital of Iceland, Iceland.
  • ,
  • Bertil Forsberg, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine/Occupational & Environmental Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
  • ,
  • Ane Johannessen, Centre for International Health, Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: ane.johannessen@uib.no.

OBJECTIVE/BACKGROUND: Little is known about associations between traffic exposure and sleep disturbances. We examined if self-reported exposure to traffic is associated with habitual snoring and daytime sleepiness in a general population.

METHODS: In the RHINE III study, 12184 adults answered questions on sleep disturbances and traffic exposure. We analysed bedrooms near roads with traffic, bedrooms with traffic noise, and travelling regularly along busy roads as proxies for traffic exposures, using logistic regression. Adjustment factors were study centre, gender, age, smoking habits, educational level, body mass index, physical activity, obstructive sleep apnoea, and sleep duration.

RESULTS: One in ten lived near a busy road, 6% slept in a bedroom with traffic noise, and 11% travelled regularly along busy roads. Habitual snoring affected 25% and daytime sleepiness 21%. More men reported snoring and more women reported daytime sleepiness. Having a bedroom with traffic noise was associated with snoring (adjusted OR 1.29, [95% CI 1.12, 1.48]). For daytime sleepiness, on the other hand, bedroom with traffic noise and high exposure to traffic pollution have significant risk factors (adjusted ORs 1.46 [1.11, 1.92] and 1.65 [1.11, 2.45]). Results were consistent across study centres.

CONCLUSIONS: Daytime sleepiness is associated with traffic pollution and traffic noise, while habitual snoring is only associated with traffic noise. Self-reported traffic exposure should be taken into account when diagnosing and planning treatment for patients with sleep disturbances, because reducing noise and pollution exposure in the bedroom may have a beneficial effect.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftSleep Medicine
Vol/bind24
Sider (fra-til)93-99
Antal sider7
ISSN1389-9457
DOI
StatusUdgivet - aug. 2016

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