Psykologisk Institut

Tanja Kirkegaard

Rewriting stress: toward a cultural psychology of collective stress at work

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Standard

Rewriting stress: toward a cultural psychology of collective stress at work. / Kirkegaard, Tanja; Brinkmann, Svend.

I: Culture & Psychology, Bind 21, Nr. 1, 2015, s. 81-94.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

Kirkegaard, T & Brinkmann, S 2015, 'Rewriting stress: toward a cultural psychology of collective stress at work', Culture & Psychology, bind 21, nr. 1, s. 81-94.

APA

Kirkegaard, T., & Brinkmann, S. (2015). Rewriting stress: toward a cultural psychology of collective stress at work. Culture & Psychology, 21(1), 81-94.

CBE

MLA

Kirkegaard, Tanja og Svend Brinkmann. "Rewriting stress: toward a cultural psychology of collective stress at work". Culture & Psychology. 2015, 21(1). 81-94.

Vancouver

Author

Kirkegaard, Tanja ; Brinkmann, Svend. / Rewriting stress: toward a cultural psychology of collective stress at work. I: Culture & Psychology. 2015 ; Bind 21, Nr. 1. s. 81-94.

Bibtex

@article{7f0ac428e01849c98330dbb74fdf2da4,
title = "Rewriting stress: toward a cultural psychology of collective stress at work",
abstract = "The aim of this article is to contribute theoretically to the development of a cultural psychological, i.e. dialogical and distributed, understanding of stress. First we challenge established cognitivist notions of stress and discuss philosophical and epistemological implications tied to this perspective. Then we introduce a dialogical, distributed and situated understanding of stress and rewrite central concepts from cognitive stress research such as appraisal and coping. This new orientation is related to a recent metaphysics of mind, according to which mental states and processes are embedded in and possibly even extend into the environment. This philosophical position is known as externalism and holds that the mind needs to be understood not just by intrinsicmental features such as physiological or cognitive processes, but also in light of what either occurs or exists outside the organism. With reference to empirical examples, we argue that this framework can contribute to a new understanding of the situated and distributed nature of stress.",
author = "Tanja Kirkegaard and Svend Brinkmann",
year = "2015",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "81--94",
journal = "Culture & Psychology",
issn = "1354-067X",
publisher = "SAGE Publications",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Rewriting stress: toward a cultural psychology of collective stress at work

AU - Kirkegaard, Tanja

AU - Brinkmann, Svend

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - The aim of this article is to contribute theoretically to the development of a cultural psychological, i.e. dialogical and distributed, understanding of stress. First we challenge established cognitivist notions of stress and discuss philosophical and epistemological implications tied to this perspective. Then we introduce a dialogical, distributed and situated understanding of stress and rewrite central concepts from cognitive stress research such as appraisal and coping. This new orientation is related to a recent metaphysics of mind, according to which mental states and processes are embedded in and possibly even extend into the environment. This philosophical position is known as externalism and holds that the mind needs to be understood not just by intrinsicmental features such as physiological or cognitive processes, but also in light of what either occurs or exists outside the organism. With reference to empirical examples, we argue that this framework can contribute to a new understanding of the situated and distributed nature of stress.

AB - The aim of this article is to contribute theoretically to the development of a cultural psychological, i.e. dialogical and distributed, understanding of stress. First we challenge established cognitivist notions of stress and discuss philosophical and epistemological implications tied to this perspective. Then we introduce a dialogical, distributed and situated understanding of stress and rewrite central concepts from cognitive stress research such as appraisal and coping. This new orientation is related to a recent metaphysics of mind, according to which mental states and processes are embedded in and possibly even extend into the environment. This philosophical position is known as externalism and holds that the mind needs to be understood not just by intrinsicmental features such as physiological or cognitive processes, but also in light of what either occurs or exists outside the organism. With reference to empirical examples, we argue that this framework can contribute to a new understanding of the situated and distributed nature of stress.

M3 - Journal article

VL - 21

SP - 81

EP - 94

JO - Culture & Psychology

JF - Culture & Psychology

SN - 1354-067X

IS - 1

ER -