Rune Dietz

Sled dogs as sentinel species for monitoring arctic ecosystem health

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/proceedingBidrag til bog/antologiForskningpeer review

Standard

Sled dogs as sentinel species for monitoring arctic ecosystem health. / Sonne, Christian; Letcher, Robert J.; Jenssen, Bjørn M.; Desforges, Jean Pierre; Eulaers, Igor; Andersen-Ranberg, Emilie; Gustavson, Kim; Bossi, Rosanna; Styrishave, Bjarne; Sinding, Mikkel Holger S.; Dietz, Rune.

Pets as Sentinels, Forecasters and Promoters of Human Health. red. / M. Ramiro Pastorinho; Ana Catarina A. Sousa. Cham : Springer, 2019. s. 21-45.

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/proceedingBidrag til bog/antologiForskningpeer review

Harvard

Sonne, C, Letcher, RJ, Jenssen, BM, Desforges, JP, Eulaers, I, Andersen-Ranberg, E, Gustavson, K, Bossi, R, Styrishave, B, Sinding, MHS & Dietz, R 2019, Sled dogs as sentinel species for monitoring arctic ecosystem health. i MR Pastorinho & ACA Sousa (red), Pets as Sentinels, Forecasters and Promoters of Human Health. Springer, Cham, s. 21-45. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-30734-9_2

APA

Sonne, C., Letcher, R. J., Jenssen, B. M., Desforges, J. P., Eulaers, I., Andersen-Ranberg, E., Gustavson, K., Bossi, R., Styrishave, B., Sinding, M. H. S., & Dietz, R. (2019). Sled dogs as sentinel species for monitoring arctic ecosystem health. I M. R. Pastorinho, & A. C. A. Sousa (red.), Pets as Sentinels, Forecasters and Promoters of Human Health (s. 21-45). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-30734-9_2

CBE

Sonne C, Letcher RJ, Jenssen BM, Desforges JP, Eulaers I, Andersen-Ranberg E, Gustavson K, Bossi R, Styrishave B, Sinding MHS, Dietz R. 2019. Sled dogs as sentinel species for monitoring arctic ecosystem health. Pastorinho MR, Sousa ACA, red. I Pets as Sentinels, Forecasters and Promoters of Human Health. Cham: Springer. s. 21-45. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-30734-9_2

MLA

Sonne, Christian o.a.. "Sled dogs as sentinel species for monitoring arctic ecosystem health". og Pastorinho, M. Ramiro Sousa, Ana Catarina A. (red.). Pets as Sentinels, Forecasters and Promoters of Human Health. Kapitel 2, Cham: Springer. 2019, 21-45. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-30734-9_2

Vancouver

Sonne C, Letcher RJ, Jenssen BM, Desforges JP, Eulaers I, Andersen-Ranberg E o.a. Sled dogs as sentinel species for monitoring arctic ecosystem health. I Pastorinho MR, Sousa ACA, red., Pets as Sentinels, Forecasters and Promoters of Human Health. Cham: Springer. 2019. s. 21-45 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-30734-9_2

Author

Sonne, Christian ; Letcher, Robert J. ; Jenssen, Bjørn M. ; Desforges, Jean Pierre ; Eulaers, Igor ; Andersen-Ranberg, Emilie ; Gustavson, Kim ; Bossi, Rosanna ; Styrishave, Bjarne ; Sinding, Mikkel Holger S. ; Dietz, Rune. / Sled dogs as sentinel species for monitoring arctic ecosystem health. Pets as Sentinels, Forecasters and Promoters of Human Health. red. / M. Ramiro Pastorinho ; Ana Catarina A. Sousa. Cham : Springer, 2019. s. 21-45

Bibtex

@inbook{f72eb93611754169a5171d1ed15ae112,
title = "Sled dogs as sentinel species for monitoring arctic ecosystem health",
abstract = "Here we review sled dogs as a sentinel monitoring species of ecosystem health across the Arctic focusing on environmental changes including pollution, climate change, and infectious diseases. Studies on environmental contaminants have been carried out mostly in Alaska and Greenland. While the majority of reports focus on mercury exposure and health effects, a major classical case-controlled study of exposure and effects from persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has been carried out on Greenland sled dog bitches and their pups. Altogether, the studies show that mercury and POPs affect multiple health endpoints across physiological systems, including reproductive, endocrine, and immune systems, that ultimately affect systems such as the liver and kidney. Therefore, sled dogs have proved to be a good model for assessing the health effects from contaminant exposure of top predators and Northerners in the Arctic. Furthermore, they are widelydistributed across the Arctic and show similar correlations to important health indicators reported in Northerners and polar bears. With respect to climate change and disease dynamics of zoonosis, most studies have taken place in Canada. However, at present sled dogs are not utilized in monitoring studies of zoonotic diseases. Such an inclusion will increasethe understanding of environmental changes, pollution, and diseases dynamics in Northerners and wildlife. We therefore recommend that ecosystem health assessments in the Arctic including that of Northerners start to include analyses of sleddogs combined with modeling tools. Doing so in a circumpolar perspective will further increase our understanding and monitoring possibilities of ecosystem health and Northerners exposure to contaminants, diseases, and climate change in the Arctic.",
keywords = "Arctic, Arctic fox, Climate change, Contaminants, Diseases, Ecosystem, Endocrine, Energetics, Genetics, Histopathology, Hormones, Immune, Inuits, Mercury, OHCs, One Health, Organohalogen, PBPK, PCB, Persistent organic pollutants, Polar bears, POPs, Sentinels, Sled dogs, Vitamins, Zoonosis",
author = "Christian Sonne and Letcher, {Robert J.} and Jenssen, {Bj{\o}rn M.} and Desforges, {Jean Pierre} and Igor Eulaers and Emilie Andersen-Ranberg and Kim Gustavson and Rosanna Bossi and Bjarne Styrishave and Sinding, {Mikkel Holger S.} and Rune Dietz",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1007/978-3-030-30734-9_2",
language = "English",
isbn = "9783030307332",
pages = "21--45",
editor = "Pastorinho, {M. Ramiro } and Sousa, {Ana Catarina A. }",
booktitle = "Pets as Sentinels, Forecasters and Promoters of Human Health",
publisher = "Springer",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - Sled dogs as sentinel species for monitoring arctic ecosystem health

AU - Sonne, Christian

AU - Letcher, Robert J.

AU - Jenssen, Bjørn M.

AU - Desforges, Jean Pierre

AU - Eulaers, Igor

AU - Andersen-Ranberg, Emilie

AU - Gustavson, Kim

AU - Bossi, Rosanna

AU - Styrishave, Bjarne

AU - Sinding, Mikkel Holger S.

AU - Dietz, Rune

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Here we review sled dogs as a sentinel monitoring species of ecosystem health across the Arctic focusing on environmental changes including pollution, climate change, and infectious diseases. Studies on environmental contaminants have been carried out mostly in Alaska and Greenland. While the majority of reports focus on mercury exposure and health effects, a major classical case-controlled study of exposure and effects from persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has been carried out on Greenland sled dog bitches and their pups. Altogether, the studies show that mercury and POPs affect multiple health endpoints across physiological systems, including reproductive, endocrine, and immune systems, that ultimately affect systems such as the liver and kidney. Therefore, sled dogs have proved to be a good model for assessing the health effects from contaminant exposure of top predators and Northerners in the Arctic. Furthermore, they are widelydistributed across the Arctic and show similar correlations to important health indicators reported in Northerners and polar bears. With respect to climate change and disease dynamics of zoonosis, most studies have taken place in Canada. However, at present sled dogs are not utilized in monitoring studies of zoonotic diseases. Such an inclusion will increasethe understanding of environmental changes, pollution, and diseases dynamics in Northerners and wildlife. We therefore recommend that ecosystem health assessments in the Arctic including that of Northerners start to include analyses of sleddogs combined with modeling tools. Doing so in a circumpolar perspective will further increase our understanding and monitoring possibilities of ecosystem health and Northerners exposure to contaminants, diseases, and climate change in the Arctic.

AB - Here we review sled dogs as a sentinel monitoring species of ecosystem health across the Arctic focusing on environmental changes including pollution, climate change, and infectious diseases. Studies on environmental contaminants have been carried out mostly in Alaska and Greenland. While the majority of reports focus on mercury exposure and health effects, a major classical case-controlled study of exposure and effects from persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has been carried out on Greenland sled dog bitches and their pups. Altogether, the studies show that mercury and POPs affect multiple health endpoints across physiological systems, including reproductive, endocrine, and immune systems, that ultimately affect systems such as the liver and kidney. Therefore, sled dogs have proved to be a good model for assessing the health effects from contaminant exposure of top predators and Northerners in the Arctic. Furthermore, they are widelydistributed across the Arctic and show similar correlations to important health indicators reported in Northerners and polar bears. With respect to climate change and disease dynamics of zoonosis, most studies have taken place in Canada. However, at present sled dogs are not utilized in monitoring studies of zoonotic diseases. Such an inclusion will increasethe understanding of environmental changes, pollution, and diseases dynamics in Northerners and wildlife. We therefore recommend that ecosystem health assessments in the Arctic including that of Northerners start to include analyses of sleddogs combined with modeling tools. Doing so in a circumpolar perspective will further increase our understanding and monitoring possibilities of ecosystem health and Northerners exposure to contaminants, diseases, and climate change in the Arctic.

KW - Arctic

KW - Arctic fox

KW - Climate change

KW - Contaminants

KW - Diseases

KW - Ecosystem

KW - Endocrine

KW - Energetics

KW - Genetics

KW - Histopathology

KW - Hormones

KW - Immune

KW - Inuits

KW - Mercury

KW - OHCs

KW - One Health

KW - Organohalogen

KW - PBPK

KW - PCB

KW - Persistent organic pollutants

KW - Polar bears

KW - POPs

KW - Sentinels

KW - Sled dogs

KW - Vitamins

KW - Zoonosis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85078878908&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/978-3-030-30734-9_2

DO - 10.1007/978-3-030-30734-9_2

M3 - Book chapter

AN - SCOPUS:85078878908

SN - 9783030307332

SP - 21

EP - 45

BT - Pets as Sentinels, Forecasters and Promoters of Human Health

A2 - Pastorinho, M. Ramiro

A2 - Sousa, Ana Catarina A.

PB - Springer

CY - Cham

ER -