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Renée Marije van der Sluis

Dendritic Cell Type-Specific HIV 1 Activation in Effector T-cells: Implications for Latent HIV 1 reservoir establishment

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  • Renée Marije van der Sluis
  • Tony M van Capel, Department of Cell Biology and Histology, Center for Immunology Amsterdam (CIA) Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
  • ,
  • Dave Speijer, Department of Medical Biochemistry, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands,
  • Rogier W Sanders, Laboratory of Experimental Virology, Department of Medical Microbiology, Centre for Infection and Immunity Amsterdam (CINIMA), Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 15, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, NY 10065, New York, USA
  • ,
  • Ben Berkhout, Laboratories of Experimental Virology, Department of Medical Microbiology, Center for Infection and Immunity Amsterdam (CINIMA), Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Holland
  • Esther C de Jong, Department of Cell Biology and Histology, Center for Immunology Amsterdam (CIA) Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
  • ,
  • Rienk E Jeeninga, Laboratory of Experimental Virology, Department of Medical Microbiology, Centre for Infection and Immunity Amsterdam (CINIMA), Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 15, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, the Netherlands
  • ,
  • Thijs van Montfort, Laboratory of Experimental Virology, Department of Medical Microbiology, Centre for Infection and Immunity Amsterdam (CINIMA), Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 15, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, the Netherlands
BACKGROUND:

Latent HIV type I (HIV-1) infections can frequently occur in short-lived proliferating effector T lymphocytes. These latently infected cells could revert into resting T lymphocytes and thereby contribute to the establishment of the long-lived viral reservoir. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells can revert latency in effector T cells in vitro.
METHODS:

Here we investigated the latency activation properties of tissue-specific immune cells, including a large panel of dendritic cell subsets, to explore in which body compartments effector T cells are most likely to maintain latent HIV-1 provirus and thus potentially contribute to the long-lived reservoir.
RESULTS:

Our results demonstrate that blood or genital tract dendritic cells do not activate latent provirus in effector T cells, whereas gut or lymphoid dendritic cells induce virus production from latently infected effector T cells in our in-vitro model for latency. Toll-like receptor 3-induced interferon production by myeloid dendritic cells abolished the dendritic cells' ability to induce viral gene expression.
CONCLUSIONS:

In this study, we show that HIV-1 provirus residing in effector T cells is activated from latency by tissue-specific dendritic cell subsets and other immune cells with remarkably different efficiencies.Our new assay system points to an important, neglected aspect of HIV-1 research: the ability of other immune cells, especially dendritic cells, to differentially affect latency establishment as well as virus reactivation.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftAIDS
Vol/bind29
Nummer9
Sider (fra-til)1003-1014
ISSN0269-9370
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jun. 2015
Eksternt udgivetJa

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