Peter Vedsted

Use of primary health care prior to a postpartum psychiatric episode

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Use of primary health care prior to a postpartum psychiatric episode. / Munk-Olsen, Trine; Pedersen, Henrik Søndergaard; Laursen, Thomas Munk; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Vedsted, Peter; Vestergaard, Mogens.

I: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care. Supplement, Bind 33, Nr. 2, 06.2015, s. 127-33.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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Munk-Olsen, Trine ; Pedersen, Henrik Søndergaard ; Laursen, Thomas Munk ; Fenger-Grøn, Morten ; Vedsted, Peter ; Vestergaard, Mogens. / Use of primary health care prior to a postpartum psychiatric episode. I: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care. Supplement. 2015 ; Bind 33, Nr. 2. s. 127-33.

Bibtex

@article{45232734e73c488585395991c78cfeaa,
title = "Use of primary health care prior to a postpartum psychiatric episode",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Childbirth is a strong trigger of psychiatric episodes. Nevertheless, use of primary care before these episodes is not quantified. The aim was to study the use of general practice in Denmark from two years before to one year after childbirth in women who developed postpartum psychiatric disorders.DESIGN: A matched cohort study was conducted including women who gave birth in the period 1996-2010. Women were divided into four groups: (i) all mothers with postpartum psychiatric episodes 0-3 months after birth, n = 939; 2: All mothers with a postpartum psychiatric episode 3-12 months after birth, n = 1 436; and (iii) two comparison groups of mothers, total n = 6 630 among 320 620 eligible women.SETTING: Denmark.SUBJECTS: Women born in Denmark after 1 January 1960, restricting the cohort to women who gave birth to their first singleton child between 1 January 1996 and 20 October 2010.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The main outcome measures were consultation rates, consultation rate ratios, and rate differences.RESULTS: Women who developed a psychiatric episode after childbirth had higher GP consultation rates before, during, and after the pregnancy. Women with a psychiatric episode 0-3 months postpartum had 6.89 (95% CI 6.60; 7.18) mean number of consultations during pregnancy, corresponding to 1.52 (95% CI 1.22; 1.82) more visits than the comparison group.CONCLUSION: Women with a postpartum psychiatric episode had higher use of GP-based primary health care services years before the childbirth, and in this specific group of patients childbirth itself triggered a marked increase in the number of GP contacts postpartum.",
author = "Trine Munk-Olsen and Pedersen, {Henrik S{\o}ndergaard} and Laursen, {Thomas Munk} and Morten Fenger-Gr{\o}n and Peter Vedsted and Mogens Vestergaard",
year = "2015",
month = jun,
doi = "10.3109/02813432.2015.1041832",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "127--33",
journal = "Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care. Supplement",
issn = "0284-6020",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis A B",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Use of primary health care prior to a postpartum psychiatric episode

AU - Munk-Olsen, Trine

AU - Pedersen, Henrik Søndergaard

AU - Laursen, Thomas Munk

AU - Fenger-Grøn, Morten

AU - Vedsted, Peter

AU - Vestergaard, Mogens

PY - 2015/6

Y1 - 2015/6

N2 - OBJECTIVE: Childbirth is a strong trigger of psychiatric episodes. Nevertheless, use of primary care before these episodes is not quantified. The aim was to study the use of general practice in Denmark from two years before to one year after childbirth in women who developed postpartum psychiatric disorders.DESIGN: A matched cohort study was conducted including women who gave birth in the period 1996-2010. Women were divided into four groups: (i) all mothers with postpartum psychiatric episodes 0-3 months after birth, n = 939; 2: All mothers with a postpartum psychiatric episode 3-12 months after birth, n = 1 436; and (iii) two comparison groups of mothers, total n = 6 630 among 320 620 eligible women.SETTING: Denmark.SUBJECTS: Women born in Denmark after 1 January 1960, restricting the cohort to women who gave birth to their first singleton child between 1 January 1996 and 20 October 2010.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The main outcome measures were consultation rates, consultation rate ratios, and rate differences.RESULTS: Women who developed a psychiatric episode after childbirth had higher GP consultation rates before, during, and after the pregnancy. Women with a psychiatric episode 0-3 months postpartum had 6.89 (95% CI 6.60; 7.18) mean number of consultations during pregnancy, corresponding to 1.52 (95% CI 1.22; 1.82) more visits than the comparison group.CONCLUSION: Women with a postpartum psychiatric episode had higher use of GP-based primary health care services years before the childbirth, and in this specific group of patients childbirth itself triggered a marked increase in the number of GP contacts postpartum.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Childbirth is a strong trigger of psychiatric episodes. Nevertheless, use of primary care before these episodes is not quantified. The aim was to study the use of general practice in Denmark from two years before to one year after childbirth in women who developed postpartum psychiatric disorders.DESIGN: A matched cohort study was conducted including women who gave birth in the period 1996-2010. Women were divided into four groups: (i) all mothers with postpartum psychiatric episodes 0-3 months after birth, n = 939; 2: All mothers with a postpartum psychiatric episode 3-12 months after birth, n = 1 436; and (iii) two comparison groups of mothers, total n = 6 630 among 320 620 eligible women.SETTING: Denmark.SUBJECTS: Women born in Denmark after 1 January 1960, restricting the cohort to women who gave birth to their first singleton child between 1 January 1996 and 20 October 2010.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The main outcome measures were consultation rates, consultation rate ratios, and rate differences.RESULTS: Women who developed a psychiatric episode after childbirth had higher GP consultation rates before, during, and after the pregnancy. Women with a psychiatric episode 0-3 months postpartum had 6.89 (95% CI 6.60; 7.18) mean number of consultations during pregnancy, corresponding to 1.52 (95% CI 1.22; 1.82) more visits than the comparison group.CONCLUSION: Women with a postpartum psychiatric episode had higher use of GP-based primary health care services years before the childbirth, and in this specific group of patients childbirth itself triggered a marked increase in the number of GP contacts postpartum.

U2 - 10.3109/02813432.2015.1041832

DO - 10.3109/02813432.2015.1041832

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 26174691

VL - 33

SP - 127

EP - 133

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care. Supplement

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care. Supplement

SN - 0284-6020

IS - 2

ER -