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Peter Vedsted

The association between general practitioners' attitudes towards breast cancer screening and women's screening participation

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The association between general practitioners' attitudes towards breast cancer screening and women's screening participation. / Jensen, Line F; Mukai, Thomas; Andersen, Berit et al.

I: B M C Cancer, Bind 12, Nr. 1, 2012, s. 254.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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@article{beee7a8b0ed5498693e4a2bf281fb2a9,
title = "The association between general practitioners' attitudes towards breast cancer screening and women's screening participation",
abstract = "ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Breast cancer screening in Denmark is organised by the health services in the five regions. Although general practitioners (GPs) are not directly involved in the screening process, they are often the first point of contact to the health care system and thus play an important advisory role. No previous studies, in a health care setting like the Danish system, have investigated the association between GPs' attitudes towards breast cancer screening and women's participation in the screening programme. METHODS: Data on women's screening participation was obtained from the regional screening authorities. Data on GPs' attitudes towards breast cancer screening was taken from a previous survey among GPs in the Central Denmark Region. This study included women aged 50-69 years who had participated in the survey and were registered with a solo GP. RESULTS: The survey involved 67 singlehanded GPs with a total of 13,288 women on their lists. Five GPs (7%) had a negative attitude towards breast cancer screening. Among registered women, 81% participated in the first screening round. Multivariate analyses revealed that women registered with a GP with a negative attitude towards breast cancer screening were 17% (95% CI: 2-34%) more likely to be non-participants compared with women registered with a GP with a positive attitude towards breast cancer screening. CONCLUSION: The GPs' attitudes may influence the participation rate even in a system where GPs are not directly involved in the screening process. However, further studies are needed to investigate this association. KEYWORDS: breast cancer screening, participation, general practice.",
author = "Jensen, {Line F} and Thomas Mukai and Berit Andersen and Peter Vedsted",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1186/1471-2407-12-254",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "254",
journal = "B M C Cancer",
issn = "1471-2407",
publisher = "BioMed Central Ltd.",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The association between general practitioners' attitudes towards breast cancer screening and women's screening participation

AU - Jensen, Line F

AU - Mukai, Thomas

AU - Andersen, Berit

AU - Vedsted, Peter

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Breast cancer screening in Denmark is organised by the health services in the five regions. Although general practitioners (GPs) are not directly involved in the screening process, they are often the first point of contact to the health care system and thus play an important advisory role. No previous studies, in a health care setting like the Danish system, have investigated the association between GPs' attitudes towards breast cancer screening and women's participation in the screening programme. METHODS: Data on women's screening participation was obtained from the regional screening authorities. Data on GPs' attitudes towards breast cancer screening was taken from a previous survey among GPs in the Central Denmark Region. This study included women aged 50-69 years who had participated in the survey and were registered with a solo GP. RESULTS: The survey involved 67 singlehanded GPs with a total of 13,288 women on their lists. Five GPs (7%) had a negative attitude towards breast cancer screening. Among registered women, 81% participated in the first screening round. Multivariate analyses revealed that women registered with a GP with a negative attitude towards breast cancer screening were 17% (95% CI: 2-34%) more likely to be non-participants compared with women registered with a GP with a positive attitude towards breast cancer screening. CONCLUSION: The GPs' attitudes may influence the participation rate even in a system where GPs are not directly involved in the screening process. However, further studies are needed to investigate this association. KEYWORDS: breast cancer screening, participation, general practice.

AB - ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Breast cancer screening in Denmark is organised by the health services in the five regions. Although general practitioners (GPs) are not directly involved in the screening process, they are often the first point of contact to the health care system and thus play an important advisory role. No previous studies, in a health care setting like the Danish system, have investigated the association between GPs' attitudes towards breast cancer screening and women's participation in the screening programme. METHODS: Data on women's screening participation was obtained from the regional screening authorities. Data on GPs' attitudes towards breast cancer screening was taken from a previous survey among GPs in the Central Denmark Region. This study included women aged 50-69 years who had participated in the survey and were registered with a solo GP. RESULTS: The survey involved 67 singlehanded GPs with a total of 13,288 women on their lists. Five GPs (7%) had a negative attitude towards breast cancer screening. Among registered women, 81% participated in the first screening round. Multivariate analyses revealed that women registered with a GP with a negative attitude towards breast cancer screening were 17% (95% CI: 2-34%) more likely to be non-participants compared with women registered with a GP with a positive attitude towards breast cancer screening. CONCLUSION: The GPs' attitudes may influence the participation rate even in a system where GPs are not directly involved in the screening process. However, further studies are needed to investigate this association. KEYWORDS: breast cancer screening, participation, general practice.

U2 - 10.1186/1471-2407-12-254

DO - 10.1186/1471-2407-12-254

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 22708828

VL - 12

SP - 254

JO - B M C Cancer

JF - B M C Cancer

SN - 1471-2407

IS - 1

ER -