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Peter Vedsted

Mental well-being, job satisfaction and self-rated workability in general practitioners and hospitalisations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions among listed patients: A cohort study combining survey data on GPs and register data on patients

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Mental well-being, job satisfaction and self-rated workability in general practitioners and hospitalisations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions among listed patients : A cohort study combining survey data on GPs and register data on patients. / Nørøxe, Karen Busk; Pedersen, Anette Fischer; Carlsen, Anders Helles; Bro, Flemming; Vedsted, Peter.

I: BMJ Quality and Safety, Bind 28, Nr. 12, 01.12.2019, s. 997-1006.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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@article{b0d98817ded84ac3866abdbe52fde928,
title = "Mental well-being, job satisfaction and self-rated workability in general practitioners and hospitalisations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions among listed patients: A cohort study combining survey data on GPs and register data on patients",
abstract = "Background: Physicians' work conditions and mental well-being may affect healthcare quality and efficacy. Yet the effects on objective measures of healthcare performance remain understudied. This study examined mental well-being, job satisfaction and self-rated workability in general practitioners (GPs) in relation to hospitalisations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSC-Hs), a register-based quality indicator affected by referral threshold and prevention efforts in primary care. Methods: This is an observational study combining data from national registers and a nationwide questionnaire survey among Danish GPs. To ensure precise linkage of each patient with a specific GP, partnership practices were not included. Study cases were 461 376 adult patients listed with 392 GPs. Associations between hospitalisations in the 6-month study period and selected well-being indicators were estimated at the individual patient level and adjusted for GP gender and seniority, list size, and patient factors (comorbidity, sociodemographic characteristics). Results: The median number of ACSC-Hs per 1000 listed patients was 10.2 (interquartile interval: 7.0-13.7). All well-being indicators were inversely associated with ACSC-Hs, except for perceived stress (not associated). The adjusted incidence rate ratio was 1.26 (95% CI 1.13 to 1.42) for patients listed with GPs in the least favourable category of self-rated workability, and 1.19 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.35), 1.15 (95% CI 1.04 to 1.27) and 1.14 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.27) for patients listed with GPs in the least favourable categories of burn-out, job satisfaction and general well-being (the most favourable categories used as reference). Hospitalisations for conditions not classified as ambulatory care sensitive were not equally associated. Conclusions: ACSC-H frequency increased with decreasing levels of GP mental well-being, job satisfaction and self-rated workability. These findings imply that GPs' work conditions and mental well-being may have important implications for individual patients and for healthcare expenditures.",
keywords = "ambulatory care, General practice, human factors, primary care, quality improvement",
author = "N{\o}r{\o}xe, {Karen Busk} and Pedersen, {Anette Fischer} and Carlsen, {Anders Helles} and Flemming Bro and Peter Vedsted",
year = "2019",
month = dec,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1136/bmjqs-2018-009039",
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "997--1006",
journal = "B M J Quality and Safety",
issn = "2044-5415",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "12",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mental well-being, job satisfaction and self-rated workability in general practitioners and hospitalisations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions among listed patients

T2 - A cohort study combining survey data on GPs and register data on patients

AU - Nørøxe, Karen Busk

AU - Pedersen, Anette Fischer

AU - Carlsen, Anders Helles

AU - Bro, Flemming

AU - Vedsted, Peter

PY - 2019/12/1

Y1 - 2019/12/1

N2 - Background: Physicians' work conditions and mental well-being may affect healthcare quality and efficacy. Yet the effects on objective measures of healthcare performance remain understudied. This study examined mental well-being, job satisfaction and self-rated workability in general practitioners (GPs) in relation to hospitalisations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSC-Hs), a register-based quality indicator affected by referral threshold and prevention efforts in primary care. Methods: This is an observational study combining data from national registers and a nationwide questionnaire survey among Danish GPs. To ensure precise linkage of each patient with a specific GP, partnership practices were not included. Study cases were 461 376 adult patients listed with 392 GPs. Associations between hospitalisations in the 6-month study period and selected well-being indicators were estimated at the individual patient level and adjusted for GP gender and seniority, list size, and patient factors (comorbidity, sociodemographic characteristics). Results: The median number of ACSC-Hs per 1000 listed patients was 10.2 (interquartile interval: 7.0-13.7). All well-being indicators were inversely associated with ACSC-Hs, except for perceived stress (not associated). The adjusted incidence rate ratio was 1.26 (95% CI 1.13 to 1.42) for patients listed with GPs in the least favourable category of self-rated workability, and 1.19 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.35), 1.15 (95% CI 1.04 to 1.27) and 1.14 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.27) for patients listed with GPs in the least favourable categories of burn-out, job satisfaction and general well-being (the most favourable categories used as reference). Hospitalisations for conditions not classified as ambulatory care sensitive were not equally associated. Conclusions: ACSC-H frequency increased with decreasing levels of GP mental well-being, job satisfaction and self-rated workability. These findings imply that GPs' work conditions and mental well-being may have important implications for individual patients and for healthcare expenditures.

AB - Background: Physicians' work conditions and mental well-being may affect healthcare quality and efficacy. Yet the effects on objective measures of healthcare performance remain understudied. This study examined mental well-being, job satisfaction and self-rated workability in general practitioners (GPs) in relation to hospitalisations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSC-Hs), a register-based quality indicator affected by referral threshold and prevention efforts in primary care. Methods: This is an observational study combining data from national registers and a nationwide questionnaire survey among Danish GPs. To ensure precise linkage of each patient with a specific GP, partnership practices were not included. Study cases were 461 376 adult patients listed with 392 GPs. Associations between hospitalisations in the 6-month study period and selected well-being indicators were estimated at the individual patient level and adjusted for GP gender and seniority, list size, and patient factors (comorbidity, sociodemographic characteristics). Results: The median number of ACSC-Hs per 1000 listed patients was 10.2 (interquartile interval: 7.0-13.7). All well-being indicators were inversely associated with ACSC-Hs, except for perceived stress (not associated). The adjusted incidence rate ratio was 1.26 (95% CI 1.13 to 1.42) for patients listed with GPs in the least favourable category of self-rated workability, and 1.19 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.35), 1.15 (95% CI 1.04 to 1.27) and 1.14 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.27) for patients listed with GPs in the least favourable categories of burn-out, job satisfaction and general well-being (the most favourable categories used as reference). Hospitalisations for conditions not classified as ambulatory care sensitive were not equally associated. Conclusions: ACSC-H frequency increased with decreasing levels of GP mental well-being, job satisfaction and self-rated workability. These findings imply that GPs' work conditions and mental well-being may have important implications for individual patients and for healthcare expenditures.

KW - ambulatory care

KW - General practice

KW - human factors

KW - primary care

KW - quality improvement

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85071078520&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/bmjqs-2018-009039

DO - 10.1136/bmjqs-2018-009039

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31427467

AN - SCOPUS:85071078520

VL - 28

SP - 997

EP - 1006

JO - B M J Quality and Safety

JF - B M J Quality and Safety

SN - 2044-5415

IS - 12

ER -