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Peter Vedsted

Consultation frequency in general practice before cancer diagnosis in relation to the patient's usual consultation pattern: A population-based study

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Consultation frequency in general practice before cancer diagnosis in relation to the patient's usual consultation pattern : A population-based study. / Jensen, Henry; Vedsted, Peter; Møller, Henrik.

I: Cancer epidemiology, Bind 55, 01.08.2018, s. 142-148.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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@article{34b585eff658434e85918f2087735e8e,
title = "Consultation frequency in general practice before cancer diagnosis in relation to the patient's usual consultation pattern: A population-based study",
abstract = "Background: Cancer patients who usually consult the general practitioner (GP) rarely are generally diagnosed with more advanced stages of cancer. This subgroup of cancer patients may thus postpone relevant healthcare seeking. Aim: We aimed to investigate the rates of daytime face-to-face consultations in general practice before a cancer diagnosis in patients with different categories of ‘usual’ consultation frequency. Material and methods: We conducted a population-based comparative study using register data on all 123,934 first-time cancer patients aged 50–90 years who were diagnosed in 2009–2013 in Denmark. Usual consultation rates were based on number of consultations from 19 to 36 months before cancer diagnosis. We predicted the marginal monthly consultation rates for up to 18 months before diagnosis. These were based on the estimated (mean) rates of consultations with corresponding 95{\%} confidence intervals (CIs), which were calculated by negative binomial regression analysis with robust variance estimation. Results: Patients with cancer began to increase their consultation frequency four to six months before their cancer diagnosis. The average monthly consultation rates varied slightly across usual consultation groups; rates were lowest among male ‘frequent’ consulters (0.28 (95{\%} CI: 0.27;0.29)) and highest among female ‘frequent’ consulters (0.35 (95{\%} CI: 0.34;0.37)). The additional number of consultations was 1–2 for all combinations of usual consultation frequency, sex, and cancer type (except for female breast cancer and ‘average’ consulters with lung or prostate cancer). Conclusion: Patients with cancer begin to increase their consultation frequency in general practice before a cancer diagnosis independently of their usual consultation frequency.",
keywords = "Delivery of health care, Denmark, Early diagnosis, General practice, Neoplasms",
author = "Henry Jensen and Peter Vedsted and Henrik M{\o}ller",
year = "2018",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.canep.2018.06.007",
language = "English",
volume = "55",
pages = "142--148",
journal = "Cancer Epidemiology",
issn = "1877-7821",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Consultation frequency in general practice before cancer diagnosis in relation to the patient's usual consultation pattern

T2 - A population-based study

AU - Jensen, Henry

AU - Vedsted, Peter

AU - Møller, Henrik

PY - 2018/8/1

Y1 - 2018/8/1

N2 - Background: Cancer patients who usually consult the general practitioner (GP) rarely are generally diagnosed with more advanced stages of cancer. This subgroup of cancer patients may thus postpone relevant healthcare seeking. Aim: We aimed to investigate the rates of daytime face-to-face consultations in general practice before a cancer diagnosis in patients with different categories of ‘usual’ consultation frequency. Material and methods: We conducted a population-based comparative study using register data on all 123,934 first-time cancer patients aged 50–90 years who were diagnosed in 2009–2013 in Denmark. Usual consultation rates were based on number of consultations from 19 to 36 months before cancer diagnosis. We predicted the marginal monthly consultation rates for up to 18 months before diagnosis. These were based on the estimated (mean) rates of consultations with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs), which were calculated by negative binomial regression analysis with robust variance estimation. Results: Patients with cancer began to increase their consultation frequency four to six months before their cancer diagnosis. The average monthly consultation rates varied slightly across usual consultation groups; rates were lowest among male ‘frequent’ consulters (0.28 (95% CI: 0.27;0.29)) and highest among female ‘frequent’ consulters (0.35 (95% CI: 0.34;0.37)). The additional number of consultations was 1–2 for all combinations of usual consultation frequency, sex, and cancer type (except for female breast cancer and ‘average’ consulters with lung or prostate cancer). Conclusion: Patients with cancer begin to increase their consultation frequency in general practice before a cancer diagnosis independently of their usual consultation frequency.

AB - Background: Cancer patients who usually consult the general practitioner (GP) rarely are generally diagnosed with more advanced stages of cancer. This subgroup of cancer patients may thus postpone relevant healthcare seeking. Aim: We aimed to investigate the rates of daytime face-to-face consultations in general practice before a cancer diagnosis in patients with different categories of ‘usual’ consultation frequency. Material and methods: We conducted a population-based comparative study using register data on all 123,934 first-time cancer patients aged 50–90 years who were diagnosed in 2009–2013 in Denmark. Usual consultation rates were based on number of consultations from 19 to 36 months before cancer diagnosis. We predicted the marginal monthly consultation rates for up to 18 months before diagnosis. These were based on the estimated (mean) rates of consultations with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs), which were calculated by negative binomial regression analysis with robust variance estimation. Results: Patients with cancer began to increase their consultation frequency four to six months before their cancer diagnosis. The average monthly consultation rates varied slightly across usual consultation groups; rates were lowest among male ‘frequent’ consulters (0.28 (95% CI: 0.27;0.29)) and highest among female ‘frequent’ consulters (0.35 (95% CI: 0.34;0.37)). The additional number of consultations was 1–2 for all combinations of usual consultation frequency, sex, and cancer type (except for female breast cancer and ‘average’ consulters with lung or prostate cancer). Conclusion: Patients with cancer begin to increase their consultation frequency in general practice before a cancer diagnosis independently of their usual consultation frequency.

KW - Delivery of health care

KW - Denmark

KW - Early diagnosis

KW - General practice

KW - Neoplasms

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85049118841&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.canep.2018.06.007

DO - 10.1016/j.canep.2018.06.007

M3 - Journal article

VL - 55

SP - 142

EP - 148

JO - Cancer Epidemiology

JF - Cancer Epidemiology

SN - 1877-7821

ER -