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Peter Vedsted

Associations between home death and GP involvement in palliative cancer care

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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Associations between home death and GP involvement in palliative cancer care. / Neergaard, Mette A; Vedsted, Peter; Olesen, Frede; Sokolowski, Ineta; Jensen, Anders B; Søndergaard, Jens.

I: British Journal of General Practice, Bind 59, Nr. 566, 2009, s. 671-7.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

Neergaard, MA, Vedsted, P, Olesen, F, Sokolowski, I, Jensen, AB & Søndergaard, J 2009, 'Associations between home death and GP involvement in palliative cancer care', British Journal of General Practice, bind 59, nr. 566, s. 671-7. https://doi.org/10.3399/bjgp09X454133

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Author

Neergaard, Mette A ; Vedsted, Peter ; Olesen, Frede ; Sokolowski, Ineta ; Jensen, Anders B ; Søndergaard, Jens. / Associations between home death and GP involvement in palliative cancer care. I: British Journal of General Practice. 2009 ; Bind 59, Nr. 566. s. 671-7.

Bibtex

@article{aa4ffe10d10e11dea30a000ea68e967b,
title = "Associations between home death and GP involvement in palliative cancer care",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Most cancer patients die at institutions despite their wish for home death. GP-related factors may be crucial in attaining home death. AIM: To describe cancer patients in palliative care at home and examine associations between home death and GP involvement in the palliative pathway. DESIGN OF STUDY: Population-based, combined register and questionnaire study. SETTING: Aarhus County, Denmark. METHOD: Patient-specific questionnaires were sent to GPs of 599 cancer patients who died during a 9-month period in 2006. The 333 cases that were included comprised information on sociodemography and GP-related issues; for example knowledge of the patient, unplanned home visits, GPs providing their private phone number, and contact with relatives. Register data were collected on patients' age, sex, cancer diagnosis, place of death, and number of GP home visits. Associations with home death were analysed in a multivariable regression model with prevalence ratios (PR) as a measure of association. RESULTS: There was a strong association between facilitating home death and GPs making home visits (PR = 4.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2 to 14.9) and involvement of community nurses (PR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.0 to 1.9). No other GP-related variables were statistically significantly associated with home death. CONCLUSION: Active involvement of GPs providing home visits and the use of home nurses were independently associated with a higher likelihood of facilitating home death for cancer patients. The primary care team may facilitate home death, accommodating patients' wishes. Future research should examine the precise mechanisms of their involvement.",
keywords = "Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Attitude to Death, Denmark, Family Practice, Female, Home Care Services, House Calls, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasms, Patient Satisfaction, Terminal Care, Young Adult",
author = "Neergaard, {Mette A} and Peter Vedsted and Frede Olesen and Ineta Sokolowski and Jensen, {Anders B} and Jens S{\o}ndergaard",
year = "2009",
doi = "10.3399/bjgp09X454133",
language = "English",
volume = "59",
pages = "671--7",
journal = "British Journal of General Practice",
issn = "0960-1643",
publisher = "Royal College of General Practitioners",
number = "566",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Associations between home death and GP involvement in palliative cancer care

AU - Neergaard, Mette A

AU - Vedsted, Peter

AU - Olesen, Frede

AU - Sokolowski, Ineta

AU - Jensen, Anders B

AU - Søndergaard, Jens

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - BACKGROUND: Most cancer patients die at institutions despite their wish for home death. GP-related factors may be crucial in attaining home death. AIM: To describe cancer patients in palliative care at home and examine associations between home death and GP involvement in the palliative pathway. DESIGN OF STUDY: Population-based, combined register and questionnaire study. SETTING: Aarhus County, Denmark. METHOD: Patient-specific questionnaires were sent to GPs of 599 cancer patients who died during a 9-month period in 2006. The 333 cases that were included comprised information on sociodemography and GP-related issues; for example knowledge of the patient, unplanned home visits, GPs providing their private phone number, and contact with relatives. Register data were collected on patients' age, sex, cancer diagnosis, place of death, and number of GP home visits. Associations with home death were analysed in a multivariable regression model with prevalence ratios (PR) as a measure of association. RESULTS: There was a strong association between facilitating home death and GPs making home visits (PR = 4.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2 to 14.9) and involvement of community nurses (PR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.0 to 1.9). No other GP-related variables were statistically significantly associated with home death. CONCLUSION: Active involvement of GPs providing home visits and the use of home nurses were independently associated with a higher likelihood of facilitating home death for cancer patients. The primary care team may facilitate home death, accommodating patients' wishes. Future research should examine the precise mechanisms of their involvement.

AB - BACKGROUND: Most cancer patients die at institutions despite their wish for home death. GP-related factors may be crucial in attaining home death. AIM: To describe cancer patients in palliative care at home and examine associations between home death and GP involvement in the palliative pathway. DESIGN OF STUDY: Population-based, combined register and questionnaire study. SETTING: Aarhus County, Denmark. METHOD: Patient-specific questionnaires were sent to GPs of 599 cancer patients who died during a 9-month period in 2006. The 333 cases that were included comprised information on sociodemography and GP-related issues; for example knowledge of the patient, unplanned home visits, GPs providing their private phone number, and contact with relatives. Register data were collected on patients' age, sex, cancer diagnosis, place of death, and number of GP home visits. Associations with home death were analysed in a multivariable regression model with prevalence ratios (PR) as a measure of association. RESULTS: There was a strong association between facilitating home death and GPs making home visits (PR = 4.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2 to 14.9) and involvement of community nurses (PR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.0 to 1.9). No other GP-related variables were statistically significantly associated with home death. CONCLUSION: Active involvement of GPs providing home visits and the use of home nurses were independently associated with a higher likelihood of facilitating home death for cancer patients. The primary care team may facilitate home death, accommodating patients' wishes. Future research should examine the precise mechanisms of their involvement.

KW - Adolescent

KW - Adult

KW - Aged

KW - Attitude to Death

KW - Denmark

KW - Family Practice

KW - Female

KW - Home Care Services

KW - House Calls

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Neoplasms

KW - Patient Satisfaction

KW - Terminal Care

KW - Young Adult

U2 - 10.3399/bjgp09X454133

DO - 10.3399/bjgp09X454133

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 19761666

VL - 59

SP - 671

EP - 677

JO - British Journal of General Practice

JF - British Journal of General Practice

SN - 0960-1643

IS - 566

ER -