Per Hove Thomsen

The QTc interval and risk of cardiac events in bulimia nervosa: A long-term follow-up study

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The QTc interval and risk of cardiac events in bulimia nervosa : A long-term follow-up study. / Frederiksen, Tanja C; Christiansen, Morten K; Østergaard, Pernille C; Thomsen, Per H; Graff, Claus; Clausen, Loa; Jensen, Henrik K.

I: International Journal of Eating Disorders, Bind 51, Nr. 12, 12.2018, s. 1331-1338.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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Frederiksen, Tanja C ; Christiansen, Morten K ; Østergaard, Pernille C ; Thomsen, Per H ; Graff, Claus ; Clausen, Loa ; Jensen, Henrik K. / The QTc interval and risk of cardiac events in bulimia nervosa : A long-term follow-up study. I: International Journal of Eating Disorders. 2018 ; Bind 51, Nr. 12. s. 1331-1338.

Bibtex

@article{ba64d73e0e334d20aec86d01bc47c738,
title = "The QTc interval and risk of cardiac events in bulimia nervosa: A long-term follow-up study",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: An association between bulimia nervosa (BN) and prolonged corrected QT interval (QTc) in the electrocardiogram has been suggested, but results of previous studies are conflicting, and the risk of cardiac events in patients with BN has yet to be investigated.METHOD: We estimated mean QTc interval and relative risk of borderline (QTc >440 ms) and prolonged QTc (QTc >460 ms) between adult women with BN (N = 531) and healthy controls (N = 123). In follow-up analyses, we investigated the risk of a primary endpoint (syncope, ventricular tachycardia, and cardiac arrest) and all-cause mortality in patients with BN (N = 702) compared with a population-based cohort derived from the Danish Civil Register (N = 7,020).RESULTS: Mean QTc did not differ between patients with BN and controls. Relative risk of borderline prolonged QTc was 2.3 (p = 0.28). The number of patients and controls with prolonged QTc was small, and the risk did not differ between patients with BN and controls. Median follow-up was 10.6 years. Although there appeared to be increased risks after 5 years of follow-up, long-term risks of the primary endpoint (Hazard ratio [HR] = 1.4, p = 0.37) and all-cause mortality (HR = 1.7, p = .28), respectively, were not increased in patients with BN compared to a population-based cohort.DISCUSSION: Mean QTc did not differ between patients with BN and healthy controls, and the risk of prolonged QTc was not increased in patients with BN. There was no difference in the long-term risk of cardiac events, and long-term all-cause mortality did not differ significantly between patients with BN and a population-based cohort.",
author = "Frederiksen, {Tanja C} and Christiansen, {Morten K} and {\O}stergaard, {Pernille C} and Thomsen, {Per H} and Claus Graff and Loa Clausen and Jensen, {Henrik K}",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.",
year = "2018",
month = dec,
doi = "10.1002/eat.22984",
language = "English",
volume = "51",
pages = "1331--1338",
journal = "International Journal of Eating Disorders",
issn = "0276-3478",
publisher = "JohnWiley & Sons, Inc.",
number = "12",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The QTc interval and risk of cardiac events in bulimia nervosa

T2 - A long-term follow-up study

AU - Frederiksen, Tanja C

AU - Christiansen, Morten K

AU - Østergaard, Pernille C

AU - Thomsen, Per H

AU - Graff, Claus

AU - Clausen, Loa

AU - Jensen, Henrik K

N1 - © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

PY - 2018/12

Y1 - 2018/12

N2 - OBJECTIVE: An association between bulimia nervosa (BN) and prolonged corrected QT interval (QTc) in the electrocardiogram has been suggested, but results of previous studies are conflicting, and the risk of cardiac events in patients with BN has yet to be investigated.METHOD: We estimated mean QTc interval and relative risk of borderline (QTc >440 ms) and prolonged QTc (QTc >460 ms) between adult women with BN (N = 531) and healthy controls (N = 123). In follow-up analyses, we investigated the risk of a primary endpoint (syncope, ventricular tachycardia, and cardiac arrest) and all-cause mortality in patients with BN (N = 702) compared with a population-based cohort derived from the Danish Civil Register (N = 7,020).RESULTS: Mean QTc did not differ between patients with BN and controls. Relative risk of borderline prolonged QTc was 2.3 (p = 0.28). The number of patients and controls with prolonged QTc was small, and the risk did not differ between patients with BN and controls. Median follow-up was 10.6 years. Although there appeared to be increased risks after 5 years of follow-up, long-term risks of the primary endpoint (Hazard ratio [HR] = 1.4, p = 0.37) and all-cause mortality (HR = 1.7, p = .28), respectively, were not increased in patients with BN compared to a population-based cohort.DISCUSSION: Mean QTc did not differ between patients with BN and healthy controls, and the risk of prolonged QTc was not increased in patients with BN. There was no difference in the long-term risk of cardiac events, and long-term all-cause mortality did not differ significantly between patients with BN and a population-based cohort.

AB - OBJECTIVE: An association between bulimia nervosa (BN) and prolonged corrected QT interval (QTc) in the electrocardiogram has been suggested, but results of previous studies are conflicting, and the risk of cardiac events in patients with BN has yet to be investigated.METHOD: We estimated mean QTc interval and relative risk of borderline (QTc >440 ms) and prolonged QTc (QTc >460 ms) between adult women with BN (N = 531) and healthy controls (N = 123). In follow-up analyses, we investigated the risk of a primary endpoint (syncope, ventricular tachycardia, and cardiac arrest) and all-cause mortality in patients with BN (N = 702) compared with a population-based cohort derived from the Danish Civil Register (N = 7,020).RESULTS: Mean QTc did not differ between patients with BN and controls. Relative risk of borderline prolonged QTc was 2.3 (p = 0.28). The number of patients and controls with prolonged QTc was small, and the risk did not differ between patients with BN and controls. Median follow-up was 10.6 years. Although there appeared to be increased risks after 5 years of follow-up, long-term risks of the primary endpoint (Hazard ratio [HR] = 1.4, p = 0.37) and all-cause mortality (HR = 1.7, p = .28), respectively, were not increased in patients with BN compared to a population-based cohort.DISCUSSION: Mean QTc did not differ between patients with BN and healthy controls, and the risk of prolonged QTc was not increased in patients with BN. There was no difference in the long-term risk of cardiac events, and long-term all-cause mortality did not differ significantly between patients with BN and a population-based cohort.

U2 - 10.1002/eat.22984

DO - 10.1002/eat.22984

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 30520522

VL - 51

SP - 1331

EP - 1338

JO - International Journal of Eating Disorders

JF - International Journal of Eating Disorders

SN - 0276-3478

IS - 12

ER -