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Niels Okkels

Depression and the risk of severe infections: Prospective analyses on a nationwide representative sample

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Standard

Depression and the risk of severe infections : Prospective analyses on a nationwide representative sample. / Andersson, Niklas W.; Goodwin, Renee D.; Okkels, Niels et al.

I: International Journal of Epidemiology, Bind 45, Nr. 1, 01.02.2016, s. 131-139.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

Andersson, NW, Goodwin, RD, Okkels, N, Gustafsson, LN, Taha, F, Cole, SW & Munk-Jørgensen, P 2016, 'Depression and the risk of severe infections: Prospective analyses on a nationwide representative sample', International Journal of Epidemiology, bind 45, nr. 1, s. 131-139. https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyv333

APA

Andersson, N. W., Goodwin, R. D., Okkels, N., Gustafsson, L. N., Taha, F., Cole, S. W., & Munk-Jørgensen, P. (2016). Depression and the risk of severe infections: Prospective analyses on a nationwide representative sample. International Journal of Epidemiology, 45(1), 131-139. https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyv333

CBE

Andersson NW, Goodwin RD, Okkels N, Gustafsson LN, Taha F, Cole SW, Munk-Jørgensen P. 2016. Depression and the risk of severe infections: Prospective analyses on a nationwide representative sample. International Journal of Epidemiology. 45(1):131-139. https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyv333

MLA

Vancouver

Andersson NW, Goodwin RD, Okkels N, Gustafsson LN, Taha F, Cole SW et al. Depression and the risk of severe infections: Prospective analyses on a nationwide representative sample. International Journal of Epidemiology. 2016 feb. 1;45(1):131-139. https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyv333

Author

Andersson, Niklas W. ; Goodwin, Renee D. ; Okkels, Niels et al. / Depression and the risk of severe infections : Prospective analyses on a nationwide representative sample. I: International Journal of Epidemiology. 2016 ; Bind 45, Nr. 1. s. 131-139.

Bibtex

@article{5aafb4664607438eb411ae5398a30f5e,
title = "Depression and the risk of severe infections: Prospective analyses on a nationwide representative sample",
abstract = "Background: Preliminary research suggests an association between depression and subsequent increased risk of infections, yet little is known on this topic. This study investigated the association between depression and risk of various types of infections, including temporal and dose-response relationships. Methods: A prospective population-based study including 976 398 individuals, of whom 142 169 had a history of depression between 1995 and 2012, was conducted using linked Danish registries. Survival analyses were used to estimate the relative risk of infections among those with depression, compared with those without depression, while adjusting for gender and age. Results: Depression was associated with increased risk of a wide range of infections [incidence rate ratio (IRR)=1.61, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.49-1.74, P=0.000, for any infection]. There was no evidence of a specific temporal effect but rather a general increased risk of infection subsequent to the onset of depression, as the risk during first year (IRR=1.67, 95% CI=1.25-2.22, P = 0.000) remained elevated for the ensuing 11 years and beyond (IRR=1.61, 95% CI=1.39-1.85, P = 0.000). Dose-response analyses revealed that the risk of infection increased by 59% (IRR=1.59, 95% CI=1.45-1.75, P=0.000) following a single depressive episode and was elevated even further (IRR=1.97, 95% CI=0.92-4.22, P=0.082) following four or more depressive episodes. However, results did not indicate a perfect linear association. Conclusions: Findings suggest the presence of depression may confer an increased risk of infection and that this increased susceptibility is not confined to a specific time period following the onset of depression. A dose-response relationship may be present, but more research is needed to further examine and confirm a link between depression and risk of infection.",
keywords = "Depression, Humans, Infection, Population-based, Prospective studies, Registers",
author = "Andersson, {Niklas W.} and Goodwin, {Renee D.} and Niels Okkels and Gustafsson, {Lea N.} and Farah Taha and Cole, {Steve W.} and Povl Munk-J{\o}rgensen",
year = "2016",
month = feb,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/ije/dyv333",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "131--139",
journal = "International Journal of Epidemiology",
issn = "0300-5771",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Depression and the risk of severe infections

T2 - Prospective analyses on a nationwide representative sample

AU - Andersson, Niklas W.

AU - Goodwin, Renee D.

AU - Okkels, Niels

AU - Gustafsson, Lea N.

AU - Taha, Farah

AU - Cole, Steve W.

AU - Munk-Jørgensen, Povl

PY - 2016/2/1

Y1 - 2016/2/1

N2 - Background: Preliminary research suggests an association between depression and subsequent increased risk of infections, yet little is known on this topic. This study investigated the association between depression and risk of various types of infections, including temporal and dose-response relationships. Methods: A prospective population-based study including 976 398 individuals, of whom 142 169 had a history of depression between 1995 and 2012, was conducted using linked Danish registries. Survival analyses were used to estimate the relative risk of infections among those with depression, compared with those without depression, while adjusting for gender and age. Results: Depression was associated with increased risk of a wide range of infections [incidence rate ratio (IRR)=1.61, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.49-1.74, P=0.000, for any infection]. There was no evidence of a specific temporal effect but rather a general increased risk of infection subsequent to the onset of depression, as the risk during first year (IRR=1.67, 95% CI=1.25-2.22, P = 0.000) remained elevated for the ensuing 11 years and beyond (IRR=1.61, 95% CI=1.39-1.85, P = 0.000). Dose-response analyses revealed that the risk of infection increased by 59% (IRR=1.59, 95% CI=1.45-1.75, P=0.000) following a single depressive episode and was elevated even further (IRR=1.97, 95% CI=0.92-4.22, P=0.082) following four or more depressive episodes. However, results did not indicate a perfect linear association. Conclusions: Findings suggest the presence of depression may confer an increased risk of infection and that this increased susceptibility is not confined to a specific time period following the onset of depression. A dose-response relationship may be present, but more research is needed to further examine and confirm a link between depression and risk of infection.

AB - Background: Preliminary research suggests an association between depression and subsequent increased risk of infections, yet little is known on this topic. This study investigated the association between depression and risk of various types of infections, including temporal and dose-response relationships. Methods: A prospective population-based study including 976 398 individuals, of whom 142 169 had a history of depression between 1995 and 2012, was conducted using linked Danish registries. Survival analyses were used to estimate the relative risk of infections among those with depression, compared with those without depression, while adjusting for gender and age. Results: Depression was associated with increased risk of a wide range of infections [incidence rate ratio (IRR)=1.61, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.49-1.74, P=0.000, for any infection]. There was no evidence of a specific temporal effect but rather a general increased risk of infection subsequent to the onset of depression, as the risk during first year (IRR=1.67, 95% CI=1.25-2.22, P = 0.000) remained elevated for the ensuing 11 years and beyond (IRR=1.61, 95% CI=1.39-1.85, P = 0.000). Dose-response analyses revealed that the risk of infection increased by 59% (IRR=1.59, 95% CI=1.45-1.75, P=0.000) following a single depressive episode and was elevated even further (IRR=1.97, 95% CI=0.92-4.22, P=0.082) following four or more depressive episodes. However, results did not indicate a perfect linear association. Conclusions: Findings suggest the presence of depression may confer an increased risk of infection and that this increased susceptibility is not confined to a specific time period following the onset of depression. A dose-response relationship may be present, but more research is needed to further examine and confirm a link between depression and risk of infection.

KW - Depression

KW - Humans

KW - Infection

KW - Population-based

KW - Prospective studies

KW - Registers

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84964068016&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/ije/dyv333

DO - 10.1093/ije/dyv333

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 26708840

AN - SCOPUS:84964068016

VL - 45

SP - 131

EP - 139

JO - International Journal of Epidemiology

JF - International Journal of Epidemiology

SN - 0300-5771

IS - 1

ER -