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Mikkel Nørup Lund

KEPLER-63b: A giant planet in a polar orbit around a young sun-like star

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  • R. Sanchis-Ojeda, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • ,
  • J.N. Winn, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • ,
  • G.W. Marcy, University of California
  • ,
  • A.W. Howard, University of Hawaii
  • ,
  • H. Isaacson, University of California
  • ,
  • J.A. Johnson, California Institute of Technology
  • ,
  • G. Torres, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
  • ,
  • S. Albrecht, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
  • T.L. Campante, University of Birmingham, Danmark
  • W.J. Chaplin, University of Birmingham
  • ,
  • G.R. Davies, University of Birmingham
  • ,
  • M.N. Lund
  • J.A. Carter, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
  • ,
  • R.I. Dawson, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
  • ,
  • L.A. Buchhave, Københavns Universitet
  • ,
  • M.E. Everett, National Optical Astronomy Observatory
  • ,
  • D.A. Fischer, Yale University
  • ,
  • J.C. Geary, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
  • ,
  • R.L. Gilliland, Pennsylvania State University
  • ,
  • E.P. Horch, Southern Connecticut State University
  • ,
  • S.B. Howell, NASA Ames Research Center
  • ,
  • D.W. Latham, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
We present the discovery and characterization of a giant planet orbiting the young Sun-like star Kepler-63 (KOI-63, M = 11.6, T = 5576 K, M⊙ = 0.98 M). The planet transits every 9.43 days, with apparent depth variations and brightening anomalies caused by large starspots. The planet's radius is 6.1 ± 0.2 R , based on the transit light curve and the estimated stellar parameters. The planet's mass could not be measured with the existing radial-velocity data, due to the high level of stellar activity, but if we assume a circular orbit, then we can place a rough upper bound of 120 M ⊕ (3σ). The host star has a high obliquity (ψ = 104°), based on the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect and an analysis of starspot-crossing events. This result is valuable because almost all previous obliquity measurements are for stars with more massive planets and shorter-period orbits. In addition, the polar orbit of the planet combined with an analysis of spot-crossing events reveals a large and persistent polar starspot. Such spots have previously been inferred using Doppler tomography, and predicted in simulations of magnetic activity of young Sun-like stars.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftAstrophysical Journal
Vol/bind775
Nummer1
ISSN0004-637X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 20 sep. 2013

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