Mette Bjerre

Low adiponectin levels at baseline and decreasing adiponectin levels over 10 years of follow-up predict risk of the metabolic syndrome

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  • S Lindberg
  • ,
  • J S Jensen, Copenhagen City heart study, Bispebjerg university hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of cardiology, Gentofte university hospital, 65, Niels Andersens Vej, 2900 Hellerup, Denmark; Institute of clinical medicine, faculty of health sciences, university of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
  • ,
  • Mette Bjerre
  • Jan Frystyk
  • Allan Flyvbjerg
  • ,
  • J Jeppesen, Institute of clinical medicine, faculty of health sciences, university of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of internal medicine, Hvidovre hospital, Glostrup, Denmark.
  • ,
  • R Mogelvang, Copenhagen City heart study, Bispebjerg university hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of cardiology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.

AIM: Adiponectin is the most abundant adipokine and may play a key role in the interplay between obesity, inflammation, insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Thus, this large population-based cohort investigated whether adiponectin at baseline and/or a decrease in adiponectin during follow-up is associated prospectively with the risk of incident MetS.

METHODS: Using a prospective study design, the development of MetS was examined in 1134 healthy participants from the community. Plasma adiponectin was measured at study entry and again after a median follow-up of 9.4 years (IQR: 9.2-9.7). During follow-up, 187 participants developed MetS, and 439 presented with at least two components of MetS.

RESULTS: During follow-up, adiponectin decreased in participants who developed MetS, whereas adiponectin was increased in those who did not develop MetS (P<0.001). Those with low adiponectin levels (quartile 1) at baseline had an increased risk of developing MetS (OR: 2.92, 2.08-6.97; P<0.001) compared with those with high levels (quartile 4). After adjusting for confounding variables, low adiponectin levels at baseline remained independently associated with MetS (OR: 2.24, 1.11-4.52; P=0.017). Similarly, participants with a decrease in adiponectin during follow-up also had an increased risk of MetS (OR: 2.96, 2.09-4.18; P<0.001). This association persisted after multivariable adjustments, including for baseline adiponectin (OR: 4.37, 2.77-6.97; P<0.001). Finally, adiponectin levels at follow-up were inversely associated with an increase in the number of components of MetS (P<0.001); geometric mean adiponectin levels were 9.5mg/L (95% CI: 9.0-10.0) for participants with no components vs 7.0mg/L (95% CI: 6.3-7.9) for those with four to five components.

CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Low plasma adiponectin levels at baseline and decreasing adiponectin levels during follow-up are both associated with an increased risk of MetS.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftDiabetes & Metabolism
Vol/bind43
Nummer2
Sider (fra-til)134-139
Antal sider5
ISSN1262-3636
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1 apr. 2017

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