Psykologisk Institut

Lene Vase

Implications of Placebo and Nocebo Effects for Clinical Practice: Expert Consensus

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Dokumenter

DOI

  • Andrea W M Evers, Health, Medical and Neuropsychology Unit, Institute of Psychology, Leiden University, Leiden, the Netherlands.
  • ,
  • Luana Colloca, Departments of Pain Translational Symptoms Science and Anaesthesiology, School of Nursing and Medicine, University of Maryland Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
  • ,
  • Charlotte Blease, General Medicine and Primary Care, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • ,
  • Marco Annoni, Institute of Biomedical Technologies, National Research Council, Rome, Italy.
  • ,
  • Lauren Y Atlas, Section on Affective Neuroscience and Pain, NIH, Bethesda, Massachusetts, USA.
  • ,
  • Fabrizio Benedetti, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical and Applied Physiology Program, University of Turin Medical School, Turin, Italy.
  • ,
  • Ulrike Bingel, Department of Neurology, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany.
  • ,
  • Christian Büchel, Department of Systems Neuroscience, Center for Experimental Medicine, University Medical Center Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany
  • ,
  • Claudia Carvalho, Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, Instituto Universitário de Ciências Psicológicas, Lisbon, Portugal.
  • ,
  • Ben Colagiuri, 7 School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
  • ,
  • Alia J Crum, Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.
  • ,
  • Paul Enck, Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.
  • ,
  • Jens Gaab, Faculty of Psychology, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
  • ,
  • Andrew L Geers, Department of Psychology, University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio, USA.
  • ,
  • Jeremy Howick, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
  • ,
  • Karin B Jensen, Karolinska Institute, Sverige
  • Irving Kirsch, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Program in Placebo Studies, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • ,
  • Karin Meissner, Division of Health Promotion, University of Applied Sciences, Coburg, Germany.
  • ,
  • Vitaly Napadow, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA, USA.
  • ,
  • Kaya J Peerdeman, Health, Medical and Neuropsychology Unit, Institute of Psychology, Leiden University, Leiden, the Netherlands.
  • ,
  • Amir Raz, Departments of Psychiatry, Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University, Montreal, Québec, Canada.
  • ,
  • Winfried Rief, Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg, Germany.
  • ,
  • Lene Vase
  • Tor D Wager, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, USA.
  • ,
  • Bruce E Wampold, Modum Bad Psychiatric Center, Vikersund, Norway., University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • ,
  • Katja Weimer, Clinic for Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Ulm, Ulm, Germany.
  • ,
  • Katja Wiech, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
  • ,
  • Ted J Kaptchuk, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Program in Placebo Studies, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • ,
  • Regine Klinger, Center for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
  • ,
  • John M Kelley, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Program in Placebo Studies, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
Background: Placebo and nocebo effects occur in clinical or laboratory medical contexts after administration of an inert treatment or as part of active treatments and are due to psychobiological mechanisms such as expectancies of the patient. Placebo and nocebo studies have evolved from predominantly methodological research into a far-reaching interdisciplinary field that is unravelling the neurobiological, behavioural and clinical underpinnings of these phenomena in a broad variety of medical conditions. As a consequence, there is an increasing demand from health professionals to develop expert recommendations about evidence-based and ethical use of placebo and nocebo effects for clinical practice. Methods: A survey and interdisciplinary expert meeting by invitation was organized as part of the 1st Society for Interdisciplinary Placebo Studies (SIPS) conference in 2017. Twenty-nine internationally recognized placebo researchers participated. Results: There was consensus that maximizing placebo effects and minimizing nocebo effects should lead to better treatment outcomes with fewer side effects. Experts particularly agreed on the importance of informing patients about placebo and nocebo effects and training health professionals in patient-clinician communication to maximize placebo and minimize nocebo effects. Conclusions: The current paper forms a first step towards developing evidence-based and ethical recommendations about the implications of placebo and nocebo research for medical practice, based on the current state of evidence and the consensus of experts. Future research might focus on how to implement these recommendations, including how to optimize conditions for educating patients about placebo and nocebo effects and providing training for the implementation in clinical practice.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftPsychotherapy and Psychosomatics
Vol/bind87
Nummer4
Sider (fra-til)204-210
Antal sider7
ISSN0033-3190
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2018

Se relationer på Aarhus Universitet Citationsformater

Download-statistik

Ingen data tilgængelig

ID: 136134672