Krista Straarup

Use of social media and online dating among individuals with a history of affective disorder

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

OBJECTIVES: To investigate how individuals with a history of affective disorder use and perceive their use of social media and online dating.

METHODS: A questionnaire focusing on affective disorders and the use of social media and online dating was handed out to outpatients from unipolar depression and bipolar disorder clinics and general practice patients with or without a history of affective disorders (latter as controls). The association between affective disorders and use of social media and online dating was analysed using linear/logistic regression.

RESULTS: A total of 194 individuals with a history of unipolar depression, 124 individuals with a history of bipolar disorder and 196 controls were included in the analysis. Having a history of unipolar depression or bipolar disorder was not associated with the time spent on social media compared with controls. Using the controls as reference, having a history bipolar disorder was associated with use of online dating (adjusted odds ratio: 2.2 (95% CI: 1.3; 3.7)). The use of social media and online dating had a mood-congruent pattern with decreased and more passive use during depressive episodes, and increased and more active use during hypomanic/manic episodes. Among the respondents with a history of affective disorder, 51% reported that social media use had an aggravating effect on symptoms during mood episodes, while 10% reported a beneficial effect. For online dating, the equivalent proportions were 49% (aggravation) and 20% (benefit), respectively.

CONCLUSION: The use of social media and online dating seems related to symptom deterioration among individuals with affective disorder.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftActa Neuropsychiatrica
Sider (fra-til)1-12
Antal sider12
ISSN0924-2708
DOI
StatusE-pub ahead of print - 15 okt. 2020

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