Kirsten Høj

Developing a tool for patient involvement in general practice: The preparing patients for active involvement in medication review (PREPAIR) tool (Conference Abstract)

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisKonferenceabstrakt i tidsskriftForskningpeer review

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Developing a tool for patient involvement in general practice: The preparing patients for active involvement in medication review (PREPAIR) tool (Conference Abstract). / Sandbæk, Amanda; Møller, Marlene Christina R; Bro, Flemming; Høj, Kirsten; Christensen, Line Due; Mygind, Anna.

I: European Journal of General Practice, Bind 27, Nr. 1, 22.10.2021, s. 307.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisKonferenceabstrakt i tidsskriftForskningpeer review

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@article{e98a16c9c766496d8ae00e5cb4359def,
title = "Developing a tool for patient involvement in general practice: The preparing patients for active involvement in medication review (PREPAIR) tool (Conference Abstract)",
abstract = "Background: Active patient involvement can contribute toimproved treatment outcomes and more patient-centredcare. Yet, patient involvement remains a challenge in clinical practice.Objectives: We aimed to develop a new tool, the PREparingPatients for Active Involvement in medication Review(PREPAIR) tool, to enhance systematic patient involvement inconversations about medication optimization in general practice.Methods: A literature review was conducted and followedby co-producing activities: (1) a workshop with six GPs and(2) pilot testing including observations and interviews with22 patients, three GPs and three staff members. During thisprocess, continuous adaptations of the PREPAIR were made.Results: The final tool included five questions: (1) satisfactionwith current medications, (2) experience of taking too muchmedication, (3) major side effects, (4) experience of takingunnecessary medication, and (5) medication-related topics todiscuss with the GP (open-ended question). The PREPAIR toolwas completed by the patient before the GP consultation toencourage patient reflections on own medications. Duringthe consultation, the GP{\textquoteright}s focus changed from the computertowards the patient, questionnaire responses were reviewed,and potential medication-related problems were discussed.The patients were empowered to speak, and the GPsimproved their understanding of patient perspectives onmedications. Although some GPs suggested a broader scopeon health perspectives, the PREPAIR tool was received positively by both patients and GPs.Conclusion: We developed a brief and valuable tool to support systematic patient involvement in general practice. Futureresearch should address whether the PREPAIR tool can contribute to improved patient outcomes and quality of care.",
author = "Amanda Sandb{\ae}k and M{\o}ller, {Marlene Christina R} and Flemming Bro and Kirsten H{\o}j and Christensen, {Line Due} and Anna Mygind",
year = "2021",
month = oct,
day = "22",
doi = "10.1080/13814788.2021.1976752",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "307",
journal = "European Journal of General Practice",
issn = "1381-4788",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis ",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - ABST

T1 - Developing a tool for patient involvement in general practice: The preparing patients for active involvement in medication review (PREPAIR) tool (Conference Abstract)

AU - Sandbæk, Amanda

AU - Møller, Marlene Christina R

AU - Bro, Flemming

AU - Høj, Kirsten

AU - Christensen, Line Due

AU - Mygind, Anna

PY - 2021/10/22

Y1 - 2021/10/22

N2 - Background: Active patient involvement can contribute toimproved treatment outcomes and more patient-centredcare. Yet, patient involvement remains a challenge in clinical practice.Objectives: We aimed to develop a new tool, the PREparingPatients for Active Involvement in medication Review(PREPAIR) tool, to enhance systematic patient involvement inconversations about medication optimization in general practice.Methods: A literature review was conducted and followedby co-producing activities: (1) a workshop with six GPs and(2) pilot testing including observations and interviews with22 patients, three GPs and three staff members. During thisprocess, continuous adaptations of the PREPAIR were made.Results: The final tool included five questions: (1) satisfactionwith current medications, (2) experience of taking too muchmedication, (3) major side effects, (4) experience of takingunnecessary medication, and (5) medication-related topics todiscuss with the GP (open-ended question). The PREPAIR toolwas completed by the patient before the GP consultation toencourage patient reflections on own medications. Duringthe consultation, the GP’s focus changed from the computertowards the patient, questionnaire responses were reviewed,and potential medication-related problems were discussed.The patients were empowered to speak, and the GPsimproved their understanding of patient perspectives onmedications. Although some GPs suggested a broader scopeon health perspectives, the PREPAIR tool was received positively by both patients and GPs.Conclusion: We developed a brief and valuable tool to support systematic patient involvement in general practice. Futureresearch should address whether the PREPAIR tool can contribute to improved patient outcomes and quality of care.

AB - Background: Active patient involvement can contribute toimproved treatment outcomes and more patient-centredcare. Yet, patient involvement remains a challenge in clinical practice.Objectives: We aimed to develop a new tool, the PREparingPatients for Active Involvement in medication Review(PREPAIR) tool, to enhance systematic patient involvement inconversations about medication optimization in general practice.Methods: A literature review was conducted and followedby co-producing activities: (1) a workshop with six GPs and(2) pilot testing including observations and interviews with22 patients, three GPs and three staff members. During thisprocess, continuous adaptations of the PREPAIR were made.Results: The final tool included five questions: (1) satisfactionwith current medications, (2) experience of taking too muchmedication, (3) major side effects, (4) experience of takingunnecessary medication, and (5) medication-related topics todiscuss with the GP (open-ended question). The PREPAIR toolwas completed by the patient before the GP consultation toencourage patient reflections on own medications. Duringthe consultation, the GP’s focus changed from the computertowards the patient, questionnaire responses were reviewed,and potential medication-related problems were discussed.The patients were empowered to speak, and the GPsimproved their understanding of patient perspectives onmedications. Although some GPs suggested a broader scopeon health perspectives, the PREPAIR tool was received positively by both patients and GPs.Conclusion: We developed a brief and valuable tool to support systematic patient involvement in general practice. Futureresearch should address whether the PREPAIR tool can contribute to improved patient outcomes and quality of care.

U2 - 10.1080/13814788.2021.1976752

DO - 10.1080/13814788.2021.1976752

M3 - Conference abstract in journal

VL - 27

SP - 307

JO - European Journal of General Practice

JF - European Journal of General Practice

SN - 1381-4788

IS - 1

ER -