Katrine J Emmertsen

Predicting the Risk of Bowel-Related Quality-of-Life Impairment After Restorative Resection for Rectal Cancer: A Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Standard

Predicting the Risk of Bowel-Related Quality-of-Life Impairment After Restorative Resection for Rectal Cancer : A Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study. / Battersby, Nick J; Juul, Therese; Christensen, Peter; Janjua, Ahmed Z; Branagan, Graham; Emmertsen, Katrine J; Norton, Christine; Hughes, Robert; Laurberg, Søren; Moran, Brendan; United Kingdom Low Anterior Resection Syndrome Study Group.

I: Diseases of the Colon and Rectum, Bind 59, Nr. 4, 04.2016, s. 270-80.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

Battersby, NJ, Juul, T, Christensen, P, Janjua, AZ, Branagan, G, Emmertsen, KJ, Norton, C, Hughes, R, Laurberg, S, Moran, B & United Kingdom Low Anterior Resection Syndrome Study Group 2016, 'Predicting the Risk of Bowel-Related Quality-of-Life Impairment After Restorative Resection for Rectal Cancer: A Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study', Diseases of the Colon and Rectum, bind 59, nr. 4, s. 270-80. https://doi.org/10.1097/DCR.0000000000000552

APA

Battersby, N. J., Juul, T., Christensen, P., Janjua, A. Z., Branagan, G., Emmertsen, K. J., Norton, C., Hughes, R., Laurberg, S., Moran, B., & United Kingdom Low Anterior Resection Syndrome Study Group (2016). Predicting the Risk of Bowel-Related Quality-of-Life Impairment After Restorative Resection for Rectal Cancer: A Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study. Diseases of the Colon and Rectum, 59(4), 270-80. https://doi.org/10.1097/DCR.0000000000000552

CBE

Battersby NJ, Juul T, Christensen P, Janjua AZ, Branagan G, Emmertsen KJ, Norton C, Hughes R, Laurberg S, Moran B, United Kingdom Low Anterior Resection Syndrome Study Group. 2016. Predicting the Risk of Bowel-Related Quality-of-Life Impairment After Restorative Resection for Rectal Cancer: A Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study. Diseases of the Colon and Rectum. 59(4):270-80. https://doi.org/10.1097/DCR.0000000000000552

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Battersby, Nick J ; Juul, Therese ; Christensen, Peter ; Janjua, Ahmed Z ; Branagan, Graham ; Emmertsen, Katrine J ; Norton, Christine ; Hughes, Robert ; Laurberg, Søren ; Moran, Brendan ; United Kingdom Low Anterior Resection Syndrome Study Group. / Predicting the Risk of Bowel-Related Quality-of-Life Impairment After Restorative Resection for Rectal Cancer : A Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study. I: Diseases of the Colon and Rectum. 2016 ; Bind 59, Nr. 4. s. 270-80.

Bibtex

@article{ce9fa5c70719436e8b770fb9807f2e08,
title = "Predicting the Risk of Bowel-Related Quality-of-Life Impairment After Restorative Resection for Rectal Cancer: A Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Restorative anterior resection is considered the optimal procedure for most patients with rectal cancer and is frequently preceded by radiotherapy. Both surgery and preoperative radiotherapy impair bowel function, which adversely affects quality of life.OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to report symptoms associated with and key predictors for bowel-related quality-of-life impairment.DESIGN: The study included a cross-sectional cohort.SETTINGS: This was a multicenter study from 12 United Kingdom centers.PATIENTS: A total of 578 patients with rectal cancer underwent curative restorative anterior resection between 2001 and 2012 (median, 5.25 years postsurgery).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patients completed outcome measures that assessed bowel dysfunction (low anterior resection syndrome score), incontinence (Wexner score), and quality of life (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30), plus an anchor question: {"}Overall how does bowel function affect your quality of life?{"}RESULTS: The response rate was 80% (462/578). Overall, 85% (391/462) of patients reported bowel-related quality-of-life impairment, with 40% (187/462) reporting major impairment. A large difference in global quality of life (22 points; p < 0.001) was reported for {"}none{"} versus {"}major{"} impairment, with greatest symptom severity being diarrhea (25 points; p < 0.001), insomnia (24 points; p < 0.001), and fatigue (20 points; p < 0.001). Regression analysis identified major impairment in 60% and 45% of patients with low rectal cancer treated with and without preoperative radiotherapy compared with 47% and 33% of middle/upper rectal cancers with and without preoperative radiotherapy.LIMITATIONS: Advances in radiotherapy delivery and improvements in posttreatment symptom control, although currently of limited efficacy, imply that the content of this consent aid should be re-evaluated in 5 to 10 years.CONCLUSIONS: Before a restorative anterior resection, patients with rectal cancer should be informed that bowel-related quality-of-life impairment is common. The key risk factors are neoadjuvant therapy and a low tumor height. This study presents quality-of-life and functional outcome data, along with a consent aid, that will enhance this preoperative patient discussion.",
keywords = "Adenocarcinoma, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Anastomosis, Surgical, Chemoradiotherapy, Chemoradiotherapy, Adjuvant, Cohort Studies, Constipation, Cross-Sectional Studies, Diarrhea, Digestive System Surgical Procedures, Fecal Incontinence, Female, Great Britain, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Neoadjuvant Therapy, Neoplasm Staging, Patient Outcome Assessment, Postoperative Complications, Quality of Life, Rectal Neoplasms, Rectum",
author = "Battersby, {Nick J} and Therese Juul and Peter Christensen and Janjua, {Ahmed Z} and Graham Branagan and Emmertsen, {Katrine J} and Christine Norton and Robert Hughes and S{\o}ren Laurberg and Brendan Moran and {United Kingdom Low Anterior Resection Syndrome Study Group}",
year = "2016",
month = apr,
doi = "10.1097/DCR.0000000000000552",
language = "English",
volume = "59",
pages = "270--80",
journal = "Diseases of the Colon and Rectum",
issn = "0012-3706",
publisher = "LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Predicting the Risk of Bowel-Related Quality-of-Life Impairment After Restorative Resection for Rectal Cancer

T2 - A Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study

AU - Battersby, Nick J

AU - Juul, Therese

AU - Christensen, Peter

AU - Janjua, Ahmed Z

AU - Branagan, Graham

AU - Emmertsen, Katrine J

AU - Norton, Christine

AU - Hughes, Robert

AU - Laurberg, Søren

AU - Moran, Brendan

AU - United Kingdom Low Anterior Resection Syndrome Study Group

PY - 2016/4

Y1 - 2016/4

N2 - BACKGROUND: Restorative anterior resection is considered the optimal procedure for most patients with rectal cancer and is frequently preceded by radiotherapy. Both surgery and preoperative radiotherapy impair bowel function, which adversely affects quality of life.OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to report symptoms associated with and key predictors for bowel-related quality-of-life impairment.DESIGN: The study included a cross-sectional cohort.SETTINGS: This was a multicenter study from 12 United Kingdom centers.PATIENTS: A total of 578 patients with rectal cancer underwent curative restorative anterior resection between 2001 and 2012 (median, 5.25 years postsurgery).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patients completed outcome measures that assessed bowel dysfunction (low anterior resection syndrome score), incontinence (Wexner score), and quality of life (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30), plus an anchor question: "Overall how does bowel function affect your quality of life?"RESULTS: The response rate was 80% (462/578). Overall, 85% (391/462) of patients reported bowel-related quality-of-life impairment, with 40% (187/462) reporting major impairment. A large difference in global quality of life (22 points; p < 0.001) was reported for "none" versus "major" impairment, with greatest symptom severity being diarrhea (25 points; p < 0.001), insomnia (24 points; p < 0.001), and fatigue (20 points; p < 0.001). Regression analysis identified major impairment in 60% and 45% of patients with low rectal cancer treated with and without preoperative radiotherapy compared with 47% and 33% of middle/upper rectal cancers with and without preoperative radiotherapy.LIMITATIONS: Advances in radiotherapy delivery and improvements in posttreatment symptom control, although currently of limited efficacy, imply that the content of this consent aid should be re-evaluated in 5 to 10 years.CONCLUSIONS: Before a restorative anterior resection, patients with rectal cancer should be informed that bowel-related quality-of-life impairment is common. The key risk factors are neoadjuvant therapy and a low tumor height. This study presents quality-of-life and functional outcome data, along with a consent aid, that will enhance this preoperative patient discussion.

AB - BACKGROUND: Restorative anterior resection is considered the optimal procedure for most patients with rectal cancer and is frequently preceded by radiotherapy. Both surgery and preoperative radiotherapy impair bowel function, which adversely affects quality of life.OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to report symptoms associated with and key predictors for bowel-related quality-of-life impairment.DESIGN: The study included a cross-sectional cohort.SETTINGS: This was a multicenter study from 12 United Kingdom centers.PATIENTS: A total of 578 patients with rectal cancer underwent curative restorative anterior resection between 2001 and 2012 (median, 5.25 years postsurgery).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patients completed outcome measures that assessed bowel dysfunction (low anterior resection syndrome score), incontinence (Wexner score), and quality of life (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30), plus an anchor question: "Overall how does bowel function affect your quality of life?"RESULTS: The response rate was 80% (462/578). Overall, 85% (391/462) of patients reported bowel-related quality-of-life impairment, with 40% (187/462) reporting major impairment. A large difference in global quality of life (22 points; p < 0.001) was reported for "none" versus "major" impairment, with greatest symptom severity being diarrhea (25 points; p < 0.001), insomnia (24 points; p < 0.001), and fatigue (20 points; p < 0.001). Regression analysis identified major impairment in 60% and 45% of patients with low rectal cancer treated with and without preoperative radiotherapy compared with 47% and 33% of middle/upper rectal cancers with and without preoperative radiotherapy.LIMITATIONS: Advances in radiotherapy delivery and improvements in posttreatment symptom control, although currently of limited efficacy, imply that the content of this consent aid should be re-evaluated in 5 to 10 years.CONCLUSIONS: Before a restorative anterior resection, patients with rectal cancer should be informed that bowel-related quality-of-life impairment is common. The key risk factors are neoadjuvant therapy and a low tumor height. This study presents quality-of-life and functional outcome data, along with a consent aid, that will enhance this preoperative patient discussion.

KW - Adenocarcinoma

KW - Adult

KW - Aged

KW - Aged, 80 and over

KW - Anastomosis, Surgical

KW - Chemoradiotherapy

KW - Chemoradiotherapy, Adjuvant

KW - Cohort Studies

KW - Constipation

KW - Cross-Sectional Studies

KW - Diarrhea

KW - Digestive System Surgical Procedures

KW - Fecal Incontinence

KW - Female

KW - Great Britain

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Neoadjuvant Therapy

KW - Neoplasm Staging

KW - Patient Outcome Assessment

KW - Postoperative Complications

KW - Quality of Life

KW - Rectal Neoplasms

KW - Rectum

U2 - 10.1097/DCR.0000000000000552

DO - 10.1097/DCR.0000000000000552

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 26953985

VL - 59

SP - 270

EP - 280

JO - Diseases of the Colon and Rectum

JF - Diseases of the Colon and Rectum

SN - 0012-3706

IS - 4

ER -