Institut for Biologi

Aarhus University Seal / Aarhus Universitets segl

J.-C. Svenning

Species and phylogenetic endemism in angiosperm trees across the Northern Hemisphere are jointly shaped by modern climate and glacial–interglacial climate change

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Species and phylogenetic endemism in angiosperm trees across the Northern Hemisphere are jointly shaped by modern climate and glacial–interglacial climate change. / Feng, Gang; Ma, Ziyu; Sandel, Brody; Mao, Lingfeng; Normand, Signe; Ordonez, Alejandro; Svenning, Jens Christian.

I: Global Ecology and Biogeography, Bind 28, Nr. 10, 10.2019, s. 1393-1402.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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@article{6541442eb49d4456aa20c5fa9e59b012,
title = "Species and phylogenetic endemism in angiosperm trees across the Northern Hemisphere are jointly shaped by modern climate and glacial–interglacial climate change",
abstract = "Aims: Phylogenetic endemism describes the extent to which unique phylogenetic lineages are constrained to restricted geographic areas. Previous studies indicate that species endemism is related to both past and modern climate, but studies of phylogenetic endemism are relatively rare and mainly focused on smaller regions. Here, we provide the first assessment of the patterns of species and phylogenetic endemism in angiosperm trees across the Northern Hemisphere as well as the relative importance of modern climate and glacial–interglacial climate change as drivers of these patterns. Location: Northern Hemisphere. Major taxa: Angiosperm trees. Methods: Using tree assemblages at the scale of 100 km × 100 km grid cells and simultaneous autoregressive (SAR) models, we assessed the relationships between species endemism, phylogenetic endemism and modern climate variables, Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to present temperature velocity. Results: Species and phylogenetic endemism were associated with both modern climate and glacial–interglacial climate change, with higher values in areas with stable historical climate and warmer and wetter modern conditions. Notably, the multivariate SAR analyses showed that the combinations of variables with highest Akaike{\textquoteright}s information criterion (AIC) weight always included both LGM–present climate instability and modern climate, that is, modern precipitation and temperature. Main conclusions: Our results show that high phylogenetic endemism is partially dependent on long-term climate stability, highlighting the threat posed by future climate changes to the preservation of rare, phylogenetically distinct lineages of trees.",
keywords = "DISTRIBUTIONS, DIVERSITY, EVOLUTION, EXTINCTIONS, GLOBAL PATTERNS, INSIGHTS, Northern Hemisphere, PLANT ENDEMISM, Quaternary-scale climate change, RANGE, RICHNESS, VELOCITY, climate-richness relationship, orbitally forced species' range dynamics hypothesis, phylogenetic endemism, tree assemblages",
author = "Gang Feng and Ziyu Ma and Brody Sandel and Lingfeng Mao and Signe Normand and Alejandro Ordonez and Svenning, {Jens Christian}",
year = "2019",
month = oct,
doi = "10.1111/geb.12961",
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "1393--1402",
journal = "Global Ecology and Biogeography",
issn = "1466-822X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Species and phylogenetic endemism in angiosperm trees across the Northern Hemisphere are jointly shaped by modern climate and glacial–interglacial climate change

AU - Feng, Gang

AU - Ma, Ziyu

AU - Sandel, Brody

AU - Mao, Lingfeng

AU - Normand, Signe

AU - Ordonez, Alejandro

AU - Svenning, Jens Christian

PY - 2019/10

Y1 - 2019/10

N2 - Aims: Phylogenetic endemism describes the extent to which unique phylogenetic lineages are constrained to restricted geographic areas. Previous studies indicate that species endemism is related to both past and modern climate, but studies of phylogenetic endemism are relatively rare and mainly focused on smaller regions. Here, we provide the first assessment of the patterns of species and phylogenetic endemism in angiosperm trees across the Northern Hemisphere as well as the relative importance of modern climate and glacial–interglacial climate change as drivers of these patterns. Location: Northern Hemisphere. Major taxa: Angiosperm trees. Methods: Using tree assemblages at the scale of 100 km × 100 km grid cells and simultaneous autoregressive (SAR) models, we assessed the relationships between species endemism, phylogenetic endemism and modern climate variables, Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to present temperature velocity. Results: Species and phylogenetic endemism were associated with both modern climate and glacial–interglacial climate change, with higher values in areas with stable historical climate and warmer and wetter modern conditions. Notably, the multivariate SAR analyses showed that the combinations of variables with highest Akaike’s information criterion (AIC) weight always included both LGM–present climate instability and modern climate, that is, modern precipitation and temperature. Main conclusions: Our results show that high phylogenetic endemism is partially dependent on long-term climate stability, highlighting the threat posed by future climate changes to the preservation of rare, phylogenetically distinct lineages of trees.

AB - Aims: Phylogenetic endemism describes the extent to which unique phylogenetic lineages are constrained to restricted geographic areas. Previous studies indicate that species endemism is related to both past and modern climate, but studies of phylogenetic endemism are relatively rare and mainly focused on smaller regions. Here, we provide the first assessment of the patterns of species and phylogenetic endemism in angiosperm trees across the Northern Hemisphere as well as the relative importance of modern climate and glacial–interglacial climate change as drivers of these patterns. Location: Northern Hemisphere. Major taxa: Angiosperm trees. Methods: Using tree assemblages at the scale of 100 km × 100 km grid cells and simultaneous autoregressive (SAR) models, we assessed the relationships between species endemism, phylogenetic endemism and modern climate variables, Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to present temperature velocity. Results: Species and phylogenetic endemism were associated with both modern climate and glacial–interglacial climate change, with higher values in areas with stable historical climate and warmer and wetter modern conditions. Notably, the multivariate SAR analyses showed that the combinations of variables with highest Akaike’s information criterion (AIC) weight always included both LGM–present climate instability and modern climate, that is, modern precipitation and temperature. Main conclusions: Our results show that high phylogenetic endemism is partially dependent on long-term climate stability, highlighting the threat posed by future climate changes to the preservation of rare, phylogenetically distinct lineages of trees.

KW - DISTRIBUTIONS

KW - DIVERSITY

KW - EVOLUTION

KW - EXTINCTIONS

KW - GLOBAL PATTERNS

KW - INSIGHTS

KW - Northern Hemisphere

KW - PLANT ENDEMISM

KW - Quaternary-scale climate change

KW - RANGE

KW - RICHNESS

KW - VELOCITY

KW - climate-richness relationship

KW - orbitally forced species' range dynamics hypothesis

KW - phylogenetic endemism

KW - tree assemblages

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85068209679&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/geb.12961

DO - 10.1111/geb.12961

M3 - Journal article

AN - SCOPUS:85068209679

VL - 28

SP - 1393

EP - 1402

JO - Global Ecology and Biogeography

JF - Global Ecology and Biogeography

SN - 1466-822X

IS - 10

ER -