Institut for Biologi

Aarhus University Seal / Aarhus Universitets segl

J.-C. Svenning

Reintroducing extirpated herbivores could partially reverse the late Quaternary decline of large and grazing species

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Reintroducing extirpated herbivores could partially reverse the late Quaternary decline of large and grazing species. / Schowanek, Simon D.; Davis, Matt; Lundgren, Erick J.; Middleton, Owen; Rowan, John; Pedersen, Rasmus; Ramp, Daniel; Sandom, Christopher J.; Svenning, Jens Christian.

I: Global Ecology and Biogeography, Bind 30, Nr. 4, 04.2021, s. 896-908.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

Schowanek, SD, Davis, M, Lundgren, EJ, Middleton, O, Rowan, J, Pedersen, R, Ramp, D, Sandom, CJ & Svenning, JC 2021, 'Reintroducing extirpated herbivores could partially reverse the late Quaternary decline of large and grazing species', Global Ecology and Biogeography, bind 30, nr. 4, s. 896-908. https://doi.org/10.1111/geb.13264

APA

Schowanek, S. D., Davis, M., Lundgren, E. J., Middleton, O., Rowan, J., Pedersen, R., Ramp, D., Sandom, C. J., & Svenning, J. C. (2021). Reintroducing extirpated herbivores could partially reverse the late Quaternary decline of large and grazing species. Global Ecology and Biogeography, 30(4), 896-908. https://doi.org/10.1111/geb.13264

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Schowanek, Simon D. ; Davis, Matt ; Lundgren, Erick J. ; Middleton, Owen ; Rowan, John ; Pedersen, Rasmus ; Ramp, Daniel ; Sandom, Christopher J. ; Svenning, Jens Christian. / Reintroducing extirpated herbivores could partially reverse the late Quaternary decline of large and grazing species. I: Global Ecology and Biogeography. 2021 ; Bind 30, Nr. 4. s. 896-908.

Bibtex

@article{2c0069cb8d654ab89b716e4c21482957,
title = "Reintroducing extirpated herbivores could partially reverse the late Quaternary decline of large and grazing species",
abstract = "Aim: Reinstating large, native herbivores is an essential component of ecological restoration efforts, as these taxa can be important drivers of ecological processes. However, many herbivore species have gone globally or regionally extinct during the last 50,000 years, leaving simplified herbivore assemblages and trophically downgraded ecosystems. Here, we discuss to what extent trophic rewilding can undo these changes by reinstating native herbivores. Location: Global. Time period: We report functional trait changes from the Late Pleistocene to the present, and estimated trait changes under future scenarios. Major taxa studied: Wild, large (≥ 10 kg), terrestrial, mammalian herbivores. Methods: We use a functional trait dataset containing all late Quaternary large herbivores ≥ 10 kg to look at changes in the body mass and diet composition of herbivore assemblages, a proxy for species{\textquoteright} ecological effects. First, we assess how these traits have changed from the Late Pleistocene to the present. Next, we quantify how the current body mass and diet composition would change if all extant, wild herbivores were restored to their native ranges (and if no functional replacements were used), exploring scenarios with different baselines. Results: Defaunation has primarily removed large and grazing herbivores. Reinstating extant herbivores across their native ranges would reverse these changes, especially when reinstating them to their prehistoric distributions. It would partially restore herbivore body mass and diet composition to pre-anthropogenic conditions. However, in the absence of complementary interventions (e.g., introducing functional replacements), many herbivore assemblages would remain down-sized and browser dominated, relative to pre-anthropogenic conditions. Main conclusions: Many terrestrial herbivore assemblages—and hence ecosystems—would remain trophically downgraded, even after bringing back all extant, native herbivores. Therefore, complementary interventions would be required to achieve complete functional restoration. Nevertheless, our findings suggest that reintroducing the remaining native herbivores would diversify the herbivory and disturbances of herbivore assemblages.",
keywords = "extinction, functional ecology, large herbivores, late Quaternary, macroecology, restoration, rewilding, trophic downgrading",
author = "Schowanek, {Simon D.} and Matt Davis and Lundgren, {Erick J.} and Owen Middleton and John Rowan and Rasmus Pedersen and Daniel Ramp and Sandom, {Christopher J.} and Svenning, {Jens Christian}",
note = "Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2021 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.",
year = "2021",
month = apr,
doi = "10.1111/geb.13264",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "896--908",
journal = "Global Ecology and Biogeography",
issn = "1466-822X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reintroducing extirpated herbivores could partially reverse the late Quaternary decline of large and grazing species

AU - Schowanek, Simon D.

AU - Davis, Matt

AU - Lundgren, Erick J.

AU - Middleton, Owen

AU - Rowan, John

AU - Pedersen, Rasmus

AU - Ramp, Daniel

AU - Sandom, Christopher J.

AU - Svenning, Jens Christian

N1 - Publisher Copyright: © 2021 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

PY - 2021/4

Y1 - 2021/4

N2 - Aim: Reinstating large, native herbivores is an essential component of ecological restoration efforts, as these taxa can be important drivers of ecological processes. However, many herbivore species have gone globally or regionally extinct during the last 50,000 years, leaving simplified herbivore assemblages and trophically downgraded ecosystems. Here, we discuss to what extent trophic rewilding can undo these changes by reinstating native herbivores. Location: Global. Time period: We report functional trait changes from the Late Pleistocene to the present, and estimated trait changes under future scenarios. Major taxa studied: Wild, large (≥ 10 kg), terrestrial, mammalian herbivores. Methods: We use a functional trait dataset containing all late Quaternary large herbivores ≥ 10 kg to look at changes in the body mass and diet composition of herbivore assemblages, a proxy for species’ ecological effects. First, we assess how these traits have changed from the Late Pleistocene to the present. Next, we quantify how the current body mass and diet composition would change if all extant, wild herbivores were restored to their native ranges (and if no functional replacements were used), exploring scenarios with different baselines. Results: Defaunation has primarily removed large and grazing herbivores. Reinstating extant herbivores across their native ranges would reverse these changes, especially when reinstating them to their prehistoric distributions. It would partially restore herbivore body mass and diet composition to pre-anthropogenic conditions. However, in the absence of complementary interventions (e.g., introducing functional replacements), many herbivore assemblages would remain down-sized and browser dominated, relative to pre-anthropogenic conditions. Main conclusions: Many terrestrial herbivore assemblages—and hence ecosystems—would remain trophically downgraded, even after bringing back all extant, native herbivores. Therefore, complementary interventions would be required to achieve complete functional restoration. Nevertheless, our findings suggest that reintroducing the remaining native herbivores would diversify the herbivory and disturbances of herbivore assemblages.

AB - Aim: Reinstating large, native herbivores is an essential component of ecological restoration efforts, as these taxa can be important drivers of ecological processes. However, many herbivore species have gone globally or regionally extinct during the last 50,000 years, leaving simplified herbivore assemblages and trophically downgraded ecosystems. Here, we discuss to what extent trophic rewilding can undo these changes by reinstating native herbivores. Location: Global. Time period: We report functional trait changes from the Late Pleistocene to the present, and estimated trait changes under future scenarios. Major taxa studied: Wild, large (≥ 10 kg), terrestrial, mammalian herbivores. Methods: We use a functional trait dataset containing all late Quaternary large herbivores ≥ 10 kg to look at changes in the body mass and diet composition of herbivore assemblages, a proxy for species’ ecological effects. First, we assess how these traits have changed from the Late Pleistocene to the present. Next, we quantify how the current body mass and diet composition would change if all extant, wild herbivores were restored to their native ranges (and if no functional replacements were used), exploring scenarios with different baselines. Results: Defaunation has primarily removed large and grazing herbivores. Reinstating extant herbivores across their native ranges would reverse these changes, especially when reinstating them to their prehistoric distributions. It would partially restore herbivore body mass and diet composition to pre-anthropogenic conditions. However, in the absence of complementary interventions (e.g., introducing functional replacements), many herbivore assemblages would remain down-sized and browser dominated, relative to pre-anthropogenic conditions. Main conclusions: Many terrestrial herbivore assemblages—and hence ecosystems—would remain trophically downgraded, even after bringing back all extant, native herbivores. Therefore, complementary interventions would be required to achieve complete functional restoration. Nevertheless, our findings suggest that reintroducing the remaining native herbivores would diversify the herbivory and disturbances of herbivore assemblages.

KW - extinction

KW - functional ecology

KW - large herbivores

KW - late Quaternary

KW - macroecology

KW - restoration

KW - rewilding

KW - trophic downgrading

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85101468417&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/geb.13264

DO - 10.1111/geb.13264

M3 - Journal article

AN - SCOPUS:85101468417

VL - 30

SP - 896

EP - 908

JO - Global Ecology and Biogeography

JF - Global Ecology and Biogeography

SN - 1466-822X

IS - 4

ER -