Institut for Biologi

Aarhus University Seal / Aarhus Universitets segl

J.-C. Svenning

Global change, novel ecosystems and the ecological restoration of post-industrial areas: The case of a former brown coal mine in Søby, Denmark

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Global change, novel ecosystems and the ecological restoration of post-industrial areas : The case of a former brown coal mine in Søby, Denmark. / Conradi, Timo; Henriksen, Maria V.J.; Svenning, Jens Christian.

I: Applied Vegetation Science, Bind 24, Nr. 3, e12605, 07.2021.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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@article{5e782e26fa4b4ee199ab68b8f0e26032,
title = "Global change, novel ecosystems and the ecological restoration of post-industrial areas: The case of a former brown coal mine in S{\o}by, Denmark",
abstract = "Questions: Can multi-decadal vegetation changes in a decommissioned brown coal mine be attributed to global-change forcing? Given novel drivers of community assembly and ongoing global change, what are sensible restoration goals and strategies for large post-industrial areas?. Location: A decommissioned brown coal mine near S{\o}by, central Denmark (56°01′45′′ N, 9°04′4′′ E). Methods: We resurveyed the plant communities of the mine 31 years after an initial survey. Changes in the prevalence of exotic species and species indicator values for environmental conditions were used to link the observed vegetation changes to global change factors. Results: The plant communities, including their unmined reference sites, changed over the 31-year period toward plant communities with higher proportions of exotics, nitrophilous, warmth- and moisture-indicating species, and species of low foraging quality for deer. The changes are consistent with the novel drivers of community assembly at the site, such as the introduction of exotic species, increased nitrogen deposition, elevated temperatures, steadily increasing groundwater level post mining, and the massive comeback of red deer. Conclusions: The global-change forcing of novel plant communities suggests that it is becoming increasingly difficult to restore historical references. It may thus be more sensible to acknowledge novelty and adopt an open-ended approach for the restoration of this and similar post-industrial areas, e.g. using rewilding principles to promote biodiverse self-sustaining ecosystems.",
keywords = "brown coal mining, ecological restoration, global change, novel ecosystems, open-endedness, rewilding",
author = "Timo Conradi and Henriksen, {Maria V.J.} and Svenning, {Jens Christian}",
note = "Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2021 The Authors. Applied Vegetation Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Association for Vegetation Science",
year = "2021",
month = jul,
doi = "10.1111/avsc.12605",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
journal = "Applied Vegetation Science",
issn = "1402-2001",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Global change, novel ecosystems and the ecological restoration of post-industrial areas

T2 - The case of a former brown coal mine in Søby, Denmark

AU - Conradi, Timo

AU - Henriksen, Maria V.J.

AU - Svenning, Jens Christian

N1 - Publisher Copyright: © 2021 The Authors. Applied Vegetation Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Association for Vegetation Science

PY - 2021/7

Y1 - 2021/7

N2 - Questions: Can multi-decadal vegetation changes in a decommissioned brown coal mine be attributed to global-change forcing? Given novel drivers of community assembly and ongoing global change, what are sensible restoration goals and strategies for large post-industrial areas?. Location: A decommissioned brown coal mine near Søby, central Denmark (56°01′45′′ N, 9°04′4′′ E). Methods: We resurveyed the plant communities of the mine 31 years after an initial survey. Changes in the prevalence of exotic species and species indicator values for environmental conditions were used to link the observed vegetation changes to global change factors. Results: The plant communities, including their unmined reference sites, changed over the 31-year period toward plant communities with higher proportions of exotics, nitrophilous, warmth- and moisture-indicating species, and species of low foraging quality for deer. The changes are consistent with the novel drivers of community assembly at the site, such as the introduction of exotic species, increased nitrogen deposition, elevated temperatures, steadily increasing groundwater level post mining, and the massive comeback of red deer. Conclusions: The global-change forcing of novel plant communities suggests that it is becoming increasingly difficult to restore historical references. It may thus be more sensible to acknowledge novelty and adopt an open-ended approach for the restoration of this and similar post-industrial areas, e.g. using rewilding principles to promote biodiverse self-sustaining ecosystems.

AB - Questions: Can multi-decadal vegetation changes in a decommissioned brown coal mine be attributed to global-change forcing? Given novel drivers of community assembly and ongoing global change, what are sensible restoration goals and strategies for large post-industrial areas?. Location: A decommissioned brown coal mine near Søby, central Denmark (56°01′45′′ N, 9°04′4′′ E). Methods: We resurveyed the plant communities of the mine 31 years after an initial survey. Changes in the prevalence of exotic species and species indicator values for environmental conditions were used to link the observed vegetation changes to global change factors. Results: The plant communities, including their unmined reference sites, changed over the 31-year period toward plant communities with higher proportions of exotics, nitrophilous, warmth- and moisture-indicating species, and species of low foraging quality for deer. The changes are consistent with the novel drivers of community assembly at the site, such as the introduction of exotic species, increased nitrogen deposition, elevated temperatures, steadily increasing groundwater level post mining, and the massive comeback of red deer. Conclusions: The global-change forcing of novel plant communities suggests that it is becoming increasingly difficult to restore historical references. It may thus be more sensible to acknowledge novelty and adopt an open-ended approach for the restoration of this and similar post-industrial areas, e.g. using rewilding principles to promote biodiverse self-sustaining ecosystems.

KW - brown coal mining

KW - ecological restoration

KW - global change

KW - novel ecosystems

KW - open-endedness

KW - rewilding

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85115800250&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/avsc.12605

DO - 10.1111/avsc.12605

M3 - Journal article

AN - SCOPUS:85115800250

VL - 24

JO - Applied Vegetation Science

JF - Applied Vegetation Science

SN - 1402-2001

IS - 3

M1 - e12605

ER -