Institut for Biologi

Aarhus University Seal / Aarhus Universitets segl

J.-C. Svenning

Forest canopy height co-determines taxonomic and functional richness, but not functional dispersion of mammals and birds globally

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Forest canopy height co-determines taxonomic and functional richness, but not functional dispersion of mammals and birds globally. / Feng, Gang; Zhang, Jian; Girardello, Marco; Pellissier, Vincent; Svenning, Jens Christian.

I: Global Ecology and Biogeography, Bind 29, Nr. 8, 08.2020, s. 1350-1359.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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Feng, G, Zhang, J, Girardello, M, Pellissier, V & Svenning, JC 2020, 'Forest canopy height co-determines taxonomic and functional richness, but not functional dispersion of mammals and birds globally', Global Ecology and Biogeography, bind 29, nr. 8, s. 1350-1359. https://doi.org/10.1111/geb.13110

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Author

Feng, Gang ; Zhang, Jian ; Girardello, Marco ; Pellissier, Vincent ; Svenning, Jens Christian. / Forest canopy height co-determines taxonomic and functional richness, but not functional dispersion of mammals and birds globally. I: Global Ecology and Biogeography. 2020 ; Bind 29, Nr. 8. s. 1350-1359.

Bibtex

@article{a306a53403a94019b2dcc9db93addbcb,
title = "Forest canopy height co-determines taxonomic and functional richness, but not functional dispersion of mammals and birds globally",
abstract = "Aims: Taller forest canopies may harbour higher biodiversity by providing more and varied resources. No previous studies have assessed whether forest canopy height shapes the taxonomic and functional diversity of terrestrial vertebrates at global and regional scales. Here, we examine the roles of forest canopy height and other environmental variables in shaping global and regional patterns of species richness and functional diversity of mammals and birds. Location: Global. Time period: Present day. Major taxa studied: Terrestrial mammals and birds. Methods: Global forest canopy height data at 1 km spatial resolution were used to measure forest vertical structure. Species richness, functional richness and functional dispersion of mammals and birds were calculated using range maps and trait data. Spatial simultaneous autoregressive error models were used to evaluate associations between species richness and functional diversity and their predictors, including mean canopy height, standard deviation of canopy height, net primary productivity, current climate and historical climate stability, topography and human activities. Results: Mean canopy height emerged as one of two predictors most associated with species richness of mammals and birds as well as mammal functional richness. However, mean canopy height had little explanatory power for functional dispersion. Mean annual temperature and net primary productivity contributed most to explain global-scale mammal and bird functional dispersion. At the regional scale, mean canopy height, net primary productivity and mean annual temperature were the variables most associated with the species richness and functional diversity of mammals and birds. Main conclusions: Forest canopy height is an important predictor of species richness and functional diversity of terrestrial vertebrates at both global and regional scales, at a similar overall level to productivity and temperature. Our study highlights the crucial role of the complex vertical structure in shaping the global and regional patterns of vertebrate diversity.",
keywords = "forest vertical structure, functional biogeography, functional dispersion, functional richness, niche packing, vertical niche differentiation, PHYLOGENETIC DIVERSITY, ENERGY, VEGETATION STRUCTURE, PATTERNS, COMMUNITIES, HETEROGENEITY, SPECIES RICHNESS, SCALE, CLIMATE",
author = "Gang Feng and Jian Zhang and Marco Girardello and Vincent Pellissier and Svenning, {Jens Christian}",
year = "2020",
month = aug,
doi = "10.1111/geb.13110",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "1350--1359",
journal = "Global Ecology and Biogeography",
issn = "1466-822X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.",
number = "8",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Forest canopy height co-determines taxonomic and functional richness, but not functional dispersion of mammals and birds globally

AU - Feng, Gang

AU - Zhang, Jian

AU - Girardello, Marco

AU - Pellissier, Vincent

AU - Svenning, Jens Christian

PY - 2020/8

Y1 - 2020/8

N2 - Aims: Taller forest canopies may harbour higher biodiversity by providing more and varied resources. No previous studies have assessed whether forest canopy height shapes the taxonomic and functional diversity of terrestrial vertebrates at global and regional scales. Here, we examine the roles of forest canopy height and other environmental variables in shaping global and regional patterns of species richness and functional diversity of mammals and birds. Location: Global. Time period: Present day. Major taxa studied: Terrestrial mammals and birds. Methods: Global forest canopy height data at 1 km spatial resolution were used to measure forest vertical structure. Species richness, functional richness and functional dispersion of mammals and birds were calculated using range maps and trait data. Spatial simultaneous autoregressive error models were used to evaluate associations between species richness and functional diversity and their predictors, including mean canopy height, standard deviation of canopy height, net primary productivity, current climate and historical climate stability, topography and human activities. Results: Mean canopy height emerged as one of two predictors most associated with species richness of mammals and birds as well as mammal functional richness. However, mean canopy height had little explanatory power for functional dispersion. Mean annual temperature and net primary productivity contributed most to explain global-scale mammal and bird functional dispersion. At the regional scale, mean canopy height, net primary productivity and mean annual temperature were the variables most associated with the species richness and functional diversity of mammals and birds. Main conclusions: Forest canopy height is an important predictor of species richness and functional diversity of terrestrial vertebrates at both global and regional scales, at a similar overall level to productivity and temperature. Our study highlights the crucial role of the complex vertical structure in shaping the global and regional patterns of vertebrate diversity.

AB - Aims: Taller forest canopies may harbour higher biodiversity by providing more and varied resources. No previous studies have assessed whether forest canopy height shapes the taxonomic and functional diversity of terrestrial vertebrates at global and regional scales. Here, we examine the roles of forest canopy height and other environmental variables in shaping global and regional patterns of species richness and functional diversity of mammals and birds. Location: Global. Time period: Present day. Major taxa studied: Terrestrial mammals and birds. Methods: Global forest canopy height data at 1 km spatial resolution were used to measure forest vertical structure. Species richness, functional richness and functional dispersion of mammals and birds were calculated using range maps and trait data. Spatial simultaneous autoregressive error models were used to evaluate associations between species richness and functional diversity and their predictors, including mean canopy height, standard deviation of canopy height, net primary productivity, current climate and historical climate stability, topography and human activities. Results: Mean canopy height emerged as one of two predictors most associated with species richness of mammals and birds as well as mammal functional richness. However, mean canopy height had little explanatory power for functional dispersion. Mean annual temperature and net primary productivity contributed most to explain global-scale mammal and bird functional dispersion. At the regional scale, mean canopy height, net primary productivity and mean annual temperature were the variables most associated with the species richness and functional diversity of mammals and birds. Main conclusions: Forest canopy height is an important predictor of species richness and functional diversity of terrestrial vertebrates at both global and regional scales, at a similar overall level to productivity and temperature. Our study highlights the crucial role of the complex vertical structure in shaping the global and regional patterns of vertebrate diversity.

KW - forest vertical structure

KW - functional biogeography

KW - functional dispersion

KW - functional richness

KW - niche packing

KW - vertical niche differentiation

KW - PHYLOGENETIC DIVERSITY

KW - ENERGY

KW - VEGETATION STRUCTURE

KW - PATTERNS

KW - COMMUNITIES

KW - HETEROGENEITY

KW - SPECIES RICHNESS

KW - SCALE

KW - CLIMATE

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85085116336&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/geb.13110

DO - 10.1111/geb.13110

M3 - Journal article

AN - SCOPUS:85085116336

VL - 29

SP - 1350

EP - 1359

JO - Global Ecology and Biogeography

JF - Global Ecology and Biogeography

SN - 1466-822X

IS - 8

ER -