Inger Mechlenburg

Validation of an inertial measurement unit to determine countermovement jump height

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Validation of an inertial measurement unit to determine countermovement jump height. / Toft Nielsen, Emil; Jørgensen, Peter Bo; Mechlenburg, Inger; Sørensen, Henrik.

I: Asia-Pacific Journal of Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation and Technology, Bind 16, 2019, s. 8-13.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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Toft Nielsen, Emil o.a.. "Validation of an inertial measurement unit to determine countermovement jump height". Asia-Pacific Journal of Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation and Technology. 2019, 16. 8-13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.asmart.2018.09.002

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Toft Nielsen, Emil ; Jørgensen, Peter Bo ; Mechlenburg, Inger ; Sørensen, Henrik. / Validation of an inertial measurement unit to determine countermovement jump height. I: Asia-Pacific Journal of Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation and Technology. 2019 ; Bind 16. s. 8-13.

Bibtex

@article{5e2446f1c85046e788e075819598681c,
title = "Validation of an inertial measurement unit to determine countermovement jump height",
abstract = "Background: Vertical jump highs are used to quantify performance in the lower extremities. The aim of this study was to validate a wearable inertial measurement unit (IMU) for purpose of estimating countermovement jump height using the following methods: numerical double integration (NDI), takeoff velocity (TOV) and flight-time (FT). Methods: Fifteen students each performed three jumps in two different sessions, four weeks apart. Jump-heights calculated from motion capture and force plate were used as gold standard for global IMU position and center of mass (CoM) displacement, respectively. Results: The NDI method showed higher estimates for global position (1.39 cm, p = 0.025), and for CoM displacement (4.20 cm, p < 0.001). Narrow limits of agreements (LoA) were found (<4.8 cm). Further, a low tolerance level of determining equivalence (delta) between the two sessions regarding both global and CoM displacement (±2.80 and ± 2.90 cm) suggesting reasonable test-retest reliability. Similar bias was found for TOV and FT (p < 0.015) and wide LoAs were found for global position and for CoM displacement (TOV: ±7.05 and ± 9.36 cm, AT: ±9.27 and ± 8.49 cm). Further, high delta between the two sessions (TOV: ±3.50 cm, FT ±4.00 cm) showed poor test-retest reliability. Conclusion: Estimation of countermovement jump height using an IMU leads to the most accurate measurements applying the NDI-method. Countermovement jump estimated with an IMU can reliably evaluate functional performance in the lower extremities in young or in sports active patients after surgery or after rehabilitation. Countermovement jump with an IMU allows performing the test without a force plate and thus serves as an objective outcome measure in clinical practice.",
keywords = "countermovement jump, Inertial measurement unit, Test-retest, Wearable",
author = "{Toft Nielsen}, Emil and J{\o}rgensen, {Peter Bo} and Inger Mechlenburg and Henrik S{\o}rensen",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1016/j.asmart.2018.09.002",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "8--13",
journal = "Asia-Pacific Journal of Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation and Technology",
issn = "2214-6873",
publisher = "Elsevier (Singapore) Pte Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Validation of an inertial measurement unit to determine countermovement jump height

AU - Toft Nielsen, Emil

AU - Jørgensen, Peter Bo

AU - Mechlenburg, Inger

AU - Sørensen, Henrik

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Background: Vertical jump highs are used to quantify performance in the lower extremities. The aim of this study was to validate a wearable inertial measurement unit (IMU) for purpose of estimating countermovement jump height using the following methods: numerical double integration (NDI), takeoff velocity (TOV) and flight-time (FT). Methods: Fifteen students each performed three jumps in two different sessions, four weeks apart. Jump-heights calculated from motion capture and force plate were used as gold standard for global IMU position and center of mass (CoM) displacement, respectively. Results: The NDI method showed higher estimates for global position (1.39 cm, p = 0.025), and for CoM displacement (4.20 cm, p < 0.001). Narrow limits of agreements (LoA) were found (<4.8 cm). Further, a low tolerance level of determining equivalence (delta) between the two sessions regarding both global and CoM displacement (±2.80 and ± 2.90 cm) suggesting reasonable test-retest reliability. Similar bias was found for TOV and FT (p < 0.015) and wide LoAs were found for global position and for CoM displacement (TOV: ±7.05 and ± 9.36 cm, AT: ±9.27 and ± 8.49 cm). Further, high delta between the two sessions (TOV: ±3.50 cm, FT ±4.00 cm) showed poor test-retest reliability. Conclusion: Estimation of countermovement jump height using an IMU leads to the most accurate measurements applying the NDI-method. Countermovement jump estimated with an IMU can reliably evaluate functional performance in the lower extremities in young or in sports active patients after surgery or after rehabilitation. Countermovement jump with an IMU allows performing the test without a force plate and thus serves as an objective outcome measure in clinical practice.

AB - Background: Vertical jump highs are used to quantify performance in the lower extremities. The aim of this study was to validate a wearable inertial measurement unit (IMU) for purpose of estimating countermovement jump height using the following methods: numerical double integration (NDI), takeoff velocity (TOV) and flight-time (FT). Methods: Fifteen students each performed three jumps in two different sessions, four weeks apart. Jump-heights calculated from motion capture and force plate were used as gold standard for global IMU position and center of mass (CoM) displacement, respectively. Results: The NDI method showed higher estimates for global position (1.39 cm, p = 0.025), and for CoM displacement (4.20 cm, p < 0.001). Narrow limits of agreements (LoA) were found (<4.8 cm). Further, a low tolerance level of determining equivalence (delta) between the two sessions regarding both global and CoM displacement (±2.80 and ± 2.90 cm) suggesting reasonable test-retest reliability. Similar bias was found for TOV and FT (p < 0.015) and wide LoAs were found for global position and for CoM displacement (TOV: ±7.05 and ± 9.36 cm, AT: ±9.27 and ± 8.49 cm). Further, high delta between the two sessions (TOV: ±3.50 cm, FT ±4.00 cm) showed poor test-retest reliability. Conclusion: Estimation of countermovement jump height using an IMU leads to the most accurate measurements applying the NDI-method. Countermovement jump estimated with an IMU can reliably evaluate functional performance in the lower extremities in young or in sports active patients after surgery or after rehabilitation. Countermovement jump with an IMU allows performing the test without a force plate and thus serves as an objective outcome measure in clinical practice.

KW - countermovement jump

KW - Inertial measurement unit

KW - Test-retest

KW - Wearable

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85054467586&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.asmart.2018.09.002

DO - 10.1016/j.asmart.2018.09.002

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 30984557

AN - SCOPUS:85054467586

VL - 16

SP - 8

EP - 13

JO - Asia-Pacific Journal of Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation and Technology

JF - Asia-Pacific Journal of Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation and Technology

SN - 2214-6873

ER -