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Ellen Margrethe Hauge

Thoracic Bone Mineral Density Derived from Cardiac CT Is Associated with Greater Fracture Rate

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Thoracic Bone Mineral Density Derived from Cardiac CT Is Associated with Greater Fracture Rate. / Therkildsen, Josephine; Nissen, Louise; Jørgensen, Hanne S.; Thygesen, Jesper; Ivarsen, Per; Frost, Lars; Isaksen, Christin; Langdahl, Bente L.; Hauge, Ellen Margrethe; Boettcher, Morten; Winther, Simon.

I: Radiology, Bind 296, Nr. 3, 09.2020, s. 499-508.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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@article{f05ab3037174476dbbf1cb759a44355b,
title = "Thoracic Bone Mineral Density Derived from Cardiac CT Is Associated with Greater Fracture Rate",
abstract = "Background Osteoporosis is a prevalent, under-diagnosed, and treatable disease associated with increased fracture risk. Bone mineral density (BMD) derived from cardiac CT may be used to determine fracture rate. Purpose To assess the association between fracture rate and thoracic BMD derived from cardiac CT. Materials and Methods This prospective cohort study included consecutive participants referred for cardiac CT for evaluation of ischemic heart disease between September 2014 and March 2016. End of follow-up was June 30, 2018. In all participants, volumetric BMD of three thoracic vertebrae was measured by using quantitative CT software. The primary and secondary outcomes were any incident fracture and any incident osteoporosis-related fracture registered in the National Patient Registry, respectively. Hazard ratios were assessed by using BMD categorized as very low (<80 mg/cm3), low (80-120 mg/cm3), or normal (>120 mg/cm3). The study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (identifier: NCT02264717). Results In total, 1487 participants (mean age, 57 years ± 9; age range, 40-80 years; 52.5% women) were included, of whom 179 (12.0%) had very low BMD. During follow-up (median follow-up, 3.1 years; interquartile range, 2.7-3.4 years; range, 0.2-3.8 years), 80 of 1487 (5.3%) participants were diagnosed with an incident fracture and in 31 of 80 participants, the fracture was osteoporosis related. In unadjusted Cox regressions analyses, very low BMD was association with a greater rate of any fracture (hazard ratio, 2.6; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4, 4.7; P = .002) and any osteoporosis-related fracture (hazard ratio, 8.1; 95% CI: 2.4, 26.7; P = .001) compared with normal BMD. After adjusting for age and sex, very low BMD remained associated with any fracture (hazard ratio, 2.1; 95% CI: 1.1, 4.2) and any osteoporosis-related fracture (hazard ratio, 4.0; 95% CI: 1.1, 14.6). Conclusion Routine cardiac CT can be used to help measure thoracic bone mineral density (BMD) to identify individuals who have low BMD and a greater fracture rate.",
author = "Josephine Therkildsen and Louise Nissen and J{\o}rgensen, {Hanne S.} and Jesper Thygesen and Per Ivarsen and Lars Frost and Christin Isaksen and Langdahl, {Bente L.} and Hauge, {Ellen Margrethe} and Morten Boettcher and Simon Winther",
year = "2020",
month = sep,
doi = "10.1148/radiol.2020192706",
language = "English",
volume = "296",
pages = "499--508",
journal = "Radiology",
issn = "0033-8419",
publisher = "Radiological Society of North America, Inc.",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Thoracic Bone Mineral Density Derived from Cardiac CT Is Associated with Greater Fracture Rate

AU - Therkildsen, Josephine

AU - Nissen, Louise

AU - Jørgensen, Hanne S.

AU - Thygesen, Jesper

AU - Ivarsen, Per

AU - Frost, Lars

AU - Isaksen, Christin

AU - Langdahl, Bente L.

AU - Hauge, Ellen Margrethe

AU - Boettcher, Morten

AU - Winther, Simon

PY - 2020/9

Y1 - 2020/9

N2 - Background Osteoporosis is a prevalent, under-diagnosed, and treatable disease associated with increased fracture risk. Bone mineral density (BMD) derived from cardiac CT may be used to determine fracture rate. Purpose To assess the association between fracture rate and thoracic BMD derived from cardiac CT. Materials and Methods This prospective cohort study included consecutive participants referred for cardiac CT for evaluation of ischemic heart disease between September 2014 and March 2016. End of follow-up was June 30, 2018. In all participants, volumetric BMD of three thoracic vertebrae was measured by using quantitative CT software. The primary and secondary outcomes were any incident fracture and any incident osteoporosis-related fracture registered in the National Patient Registry, respectively. Hazard ratios were assessed by using BMD categorized as very low (<80 mg/cm3), low (80-120 mg/cm3), or normal (>120 mg/cm3). The study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (identifier: NCT02264717). Results In total, 1487 participants (mean age, 57 years ± 9; age range, 40-80 years; 52.5% women) were included, of whom 179 (12.0%) had very low BMD. During follow-up (median follow-up, 3.1 years; interquartile range, 2.7-3.4 years; range, 0.2-3.8 years), 80 of 1487 (5.3%) participants were diagnosed with an incident fracture and in 31 of 80 participants, the fracture was osteoporosis related. In unadjusted Cox regressions analyses, very low BMD was association with a greater rate of any fracture (hazard ratio, 2.6; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4, 4.7; P = .002) and any osteoporosis-related fracture (hazard ratio, 8.1; 95% CI: 2.4, 26.7; P = .001) compared with normal BMD. After adjusting for age and sex, very low BMD remained associated with any fracture (hazard ratio, 2.1; 95% CI: 1.1, 4.2) and any osteoporosis-related fracture (hazard ratio, 4.0; 95% CI: 1.1, 14.6). Conclusion Routine cardiac CT can be used to help measure thoracic bone mineral density (BMD) to identify individuals who have low BMD and a greater fracture rate.

AB - Background Osteoporosis is a prevalent, under-diagnosed, and treatable disease associated with increased fracture risk. Bone mineral density (BMD) derived from cardiac CT may be used to determine fracture rate. Purpose To assess the association between fracture rate and thoracic BMD derived from cardiac CT. Materials and Methods This prospective cohort study included consecutive participants referred for cardiac CT for evaluation of ischemic heart disease between September 2014 and March 2016. End of follow-up was June 30, 2018. In all participants, volumetric BMD of three thoracic vertebrae was measured by using quantitative CT software. The primary and secondary outcomes were any incident fracture and any incident osteoporosis-related fracture registered in the National Patient Registry, respectively. Hazard ratios were assessed by using BMD categorized as very low (<80 mg/cm3), low (80-120 mg/cm3), or normal (>120 mg/cm3). The study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (identifier: NCT02264717). Results In total, 1487 participants (mean age, 57 years ± 9; age range, 40-80 years; 52.5% women) were included, of whom 179 (12.0%) had very low BMD. During follow-up (median follow-up, 3.1 years; interquartile range, 2.7-3.4 years; range, 0.2-3.8 years), 80 of 1487 (5.3%) participants were diagnosed with an incident fracture and in 31 of 80 participants, the fracture was osteoporosis related. In unadjusted Cox regressions analyses, very low BMD was association with a greater rate of any fracture (hazard ratio, 2.6; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4, 4.7; P = .002) and any osteoporosis-related fracture (hazard ratio, 8.1; 95% CI: 2.4, 26.7; P = .001) compared with normal BMD. After adjusting for age and sex, very low BMD remained associated with any fracture (hazard ratio, 2.1; 95% CI: 1.1, 4.2) and any osteoporosis-related fracture (hazard ratio, 4.0; 95% CI: 1.1, 14.6). Conclusion Routine cardiac CT can be used to help measure thoracic bone mineral density (BMD) to identify individuals who have low BMD and a greater fracture rate.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85089710835&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1148/radiol.2020192706

DO - 10.1148/radiol.2020192706

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32662758

AN - SCOPUS:85089710835

VL - 296

SP - 499

EP - 508

JO - Radiology

JF - Radiology

SN - 0033-8419

IS - 3

ER -