Ditte Demontis

North-South Differentiation and a Region of High Diversity in European Wolves (Canis lupus)

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Dokumenter

DOI

  • A.V. Stronen, Polish Academy of Sciences
  • ,
  • B. Jedrzejewska, Polish Academy of Sciences
  • ,
  • C. Pertoldi
  • Ditte Demontis
  • Ettore Randi, Det Teknisk-Naturvidenskabelige Fakultet, Danmark
  • M. Niedziałkowska, Polish Academy of Sciences
  • ,
  • M. Pilot, Polish Academy of Sciences
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  • V.E. Sidorovich, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus
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  • I. Dykyy, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv
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  • J. Kusak, University of Zagreb
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  • E. Tsingarska, BALKANI Wildlife Society
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  • I. Kojola, Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute
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  • A.A. Karamanlidis, Civil Society for the Protection and Management of Wildlife and the Natural Environment
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  • A. Ornicans, Latvian State Forest Research Institute Silava
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  • V.A. Lobkov, National I.I. Mechnikov University
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  • V. Dumenko, Biosphere Reserve Askania-Nova
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  • S.D. Czarnomska, Polish Academy of Sciences
European wolves (Canis lupus) show population genetic structure in the absence of geographic barriers, and across relatively short distances for this highly mobile species. Additional information on the location of and divergence between population clusters is required, particularly because wolves are currently recolonizing parts of Europe. We evaluated genetic structure in 177 wolves from 11 countries using over 67K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci. The results supported previous findings of an isolated Italian population with lower genetic diversity than that observed across other areas of Europe. Wolves from the remaining countries were primarily structured in a north-south axis, with Croatia, Bulgaria, and Greece (Dinaric-Balkan) differentiated from northcentral wolves that included individuals from Finland, Latvia, Belarus, Poland and Russia. Carpathian Mountain wolves in central Europe had genotypes intermediate between those identified in northcentral Europe and the Dinaric-Balkan cluster. Overall, individual genotypes from northcentral Europe suggested high levels of admixture. We observed high diversity within Belarus, with wolves from western and northern Belarus representing the two most differentiated groups within northcentral Europe. Our results support the presence of at least three major clusters (Italy, Carpathians, Dinaric-Balkan) in southern and central Europe. Individuals from Croatia also appeared differentiated from wolves in Greece and Bulgaria. Expansion from glacial refugia, adaptation to local environments, and human-related factors such as landscape fragmentation and frequent killing of wolves in some areas may have contributed to the observed patterns. Our findings can help inform conservation management of these apex predators and the ecosystems of which they are part.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftP L o S One
Vol/bind8
Nummer10
Antal sider9
ISSN1932-6203
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 11 okt. 2013

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