Chris Kjeldsen

N-losses and energy use in a scenario for conversion to organic farming

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/proceedingBidrag til bog/antologiForskning

  • Institut for Jordbrugsproduktion og Miljø
  • Integrerede Geografiske og Sociale Studier
The aims of organic farming include the recycling of nutrients and organic matter and the minimisation of the environmental impact of agriculture. Reduced nitrogen (N)-losses and energy (E)-use are therefore fundamental objectives of conversion to organic farming. However, the case is not straightforward, and different scenarios for conversion to organic farming might lead to reduced or increased N-losses and E-use. This paper presents a scenario tool that uses a Geographical Information System in association with models for crop rotations, fertilisation practices, N-losses, and E-uses. The scenario tool has been developed within the multidisciplinary research project Land Use and Landscape Development Illustrated with Scenarios (ARLAS). A pilot scenario was carried out, where predicted changes in N-losses and E-uses following conversion to organic farming in areas with special interests in clean groundwater were compared. The N-surplus and E-use were on average reduced by 10 and 54%, respectively. However, these reductions following the predicted changes in crop rotations, livestock densities, and fertilisation practices were not large enough to ensure a statistically significant reduction at the 95% level. We therefore recommend further research in how conversion to organic farming or other changes in the agricultural practice might help to reduce N-surpluses and E-uses. In that context, the presented scenario tool would be useful
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TitelOptimizing nitrogen management in food and energy production and environmental protection : 2nd International Nitrogen Conference, Potomac, Maryland, USA, 14-18 October 2001
Antal sider8
ForlagCRC Press/Balkema
Udgivelsesår2002
Sider822-829
ISBN (trykt)90-265-1927-3
StatusUdgivet - 2002

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