Aarhus University Seal / Aarhus Universitets segl

Carl-Otto Ottosen

Proteome changes and associated physiological roles in chickpea (Cicer arietinum) tolerance to heat stress under field conditions

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  • Givemore Munashe Makonya, University of Cape Town
  • ,
  • John B.O. Ogola, University of Venda
  • ,
  • Hawwa Gabier, University of Cape Town
  • ,
  • Mohammed S. Rafudeen, University of Cape Town
  • ,
  • A. Muthama Muasya, University of Cape Town
  • ,
  • Olivier Crespo, University of Cape Town
  • ,
  • Sipho Maseko, Tshwane University of Technology
  • ,
  • Alex J. Valentine, University of Stellenbosch
  • ,
  • Carl-Otto Ottosen
  • Eva Rosenqvist, Københavns Universitet, Danmark
  • Samson B.M. Chimphango, University of Cape Town
Interrogative proteome analyses are used to identify and quantify the expression of proteins involved in heat tolerance and to identify associated physiological processes in heat-stressed plants. The objectives of the study were to identify and quantify the expression of proteins involved in heat tolerance and to identify associated physiological processes in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) heat-tolerant (Acc#7) and sensitive genotype (Acc#8) from a field study. Proteomic and gene ontological analyses showed an upregulation in proteins related to protein synthesis, intracellular traffic, defence and transport in the heat-tolerant genotype compared to the susceptible one at the warmer site. Results from KEGG analyses indicate the involvement of probable sucrose-phosphate synthase (EC 2.4.1.14) and sucrose-phosphate phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.24) proteins, that were upregulated in the heat-tolerant genotype at the warmer site, in the starch and sucrose pathway. The presence of these differentially regulated proteins including HSP70, ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activase, plastocyanin and protoporphyrinogen oxidase suggests their potential role in heat tolerance, at flowering growth stage, in field-grown chickpea. This observation supports unaltered physiological and biochemical performance of the heat-tolerant genotypes (Acc#7) relative to the susceptible genotype (Acc#8) in related studies (Makonya et al. 2019). Characterisation of the candidate proteins identified in the current study as well as their specific roles in the tolerance to heat stress in chickpea are integral to further crop improvement initiatives.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftFunctional Plant Biology
Vol/bind49
Nummer1
Sider (fra-til)13-24
Antal sider12
ISSN1445-4408
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jan. 2022

Se relationer på Aarhus Universitet Citationsformater

ID: 227137412