Aarhus University Seal / Aarhus Universitets segl

Asbjørn Mohr Drewes

Assessing analgesic actions of opioids by experimental pain models in healthy volunteers - an updated review

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Standard

Assessing analgesic actions of opioids by experimental pain models in healthy volunteers - an updated review. / Staahl, Camilla; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Andresen, Trine; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr.

I: British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, Bind 68, Nr. 2, 2009, s. 149-68.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

Staahl, C, Olesen, AE, Andresen, T, Arendt-Nielsen, L & Drewes, AM 2009, 'Assessing analgesic actions of opioids by experimental pain models in healthy volunteers - an updated review', British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, bind 68, nr. 2, s. 149-68. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2125.2009.03456.x

APA

Staahl, C., Olesen, A. E., Andresen, T., Arendt-Nielsen, L., & Drewes, A. M. (2009). Assessing analgesic actions of opioids by experimental pain models in healthy volunteers - an updated review. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 68(2), 149-68. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2125.2009.03456.x

CBE

Staahl C, Olesen AE, Andresen T, Arendt-Nielsen L, Drewes AM. 2009. Assessing analgesic actions of opioids by experimental pain models in healthy volunteers - an updated review. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. 68(2):149-68. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2125.2009.03456.x

MLA

Vancouver

Staahl C, Olesen AE, Andresen T, Arendt-Nielsen L, Drewes AM. Assessing analgesic actions of opioids by experimental pain models in healthy volunteers - an updated review. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. 2009;68(2):149-68. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2125.2009.03456.x

Author

Staahl, Camilla ; Olesen, Anne Estrup ; Andresen, Trine ; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars ; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr. / Assessing analgesic actions of opioids by experimental pain models in healthy volunteers - an updated review. I: British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. 2009 ; Bind 68, Nr. 2. s. 149-68.

Bibtex

@article{e52e7b70207711dfb95d000ea68e967b,
title = "Assessing analgesic actions of opioids by experimental pain models in healthy volunteers - an updated review",
abstract = "AIM: Experimental pain models may help to evaluate the mechanisms of action of analgesics and target the clinical indications for their use. This review addresses how the efficacy of opioids can be assessed in human volunteers using experimental pain models. The drawback with the different study designs is also discussed. METHOD: A literature search was completed for randomized controlled studies which included human experimental pain models, healthy volunteers and opioids. RESULTS: Opioids with a strong affinity for the micro-opioid receptor decreased the sensation in a variety of experimental pain modalities, but strong tonic pain was attenuated more than short lasting pain and non-painful sensations. The effects of opioids with weaker affinity for the micro-opioid receptor were detected by a more narrow range of pain models, and the assessment methods needed to be more sensitive. CONCLUSION: The way the pain is induced, assessed and summarized is very important for the sensitivity of the pain models. This review gives an overview of how different opioids perform in experimental pain models. Generally experimental pain models need to be designed with careful consideration of pharmacological mechanisms and pharmacokinetics of analgesics. This knowledge can aid the decisions needed to be taken when designing experimental pain studies for compounds entering phase 1 clinical trials.",
author = "Camilla Staahl and Olesen, {Anne Estrup} and Trine Andresen and Lars Arendt-Nielsen and Drewes, {Asbj{\o}rn Mohr}",
year = "2009",
doi = "10.1111/j.1365-2125.2009.03456.x",
language = "English",
volume = "68",
pages = "149--68",
journal = "British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology",
issn = "0306-5251",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Assessing analgesic actions of opioids by experimental pain models in healthy volunteers - an updated review

AU - Staahl, Camilla

AU - Olesen, Anne Estrup

AU - Andresen, Trine

AU - Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

AU - Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - AIM: Experimental pain models may help to evaluate the mechanisms of action of analgesics and target the clinical indications for their use. This review addresses how the efficacy of opioids can be assessed in human volunteers using experimental pain models. The drawback with the different study designs is also discussed. METHOD: A literature search was completed for randomized controlled studies which included human experimental pain models, healthy volunteers and opioids. RESULTS: Opioids with a strong affinity for the micro-opioid receptor decreased the sensation in a variety of experimental pain modalities, but strong tonic pain was attenuated more than short lasting pain and non-painful sensations. The effects of opioids with weaker affinity for the micro-opioid receptor were detected by a more narrow range of pain models, and the assessment methods needed to be more sensitive. CONCLUSION: The way the pain is induced, assessed and summarized is very important for the sensitivity of the pain models. This review gives an overview of how different opioids perform in experimental pain models. Generally experimental pain models need to be designed with careful consideration of pharmacological mechanisms and pharmacokinetics of analgesics. This knowledge can aid the decisions needed to be taken when designing experimental pain studies for compounds entering phase 1 clinical trials.

AB - AIM: Experimental pain models may help to evaluate the mechanisms of action of analgesics and target the clinical indications for their use. This review addresses how the efficacy of opioids can be assessed in human volunteers using experimental pain models. The drawback with the different study designs is also discussed. METHOD: A literature search was completed for randomized controlled studies which included human experimental pain models, healthy volunteers and opioids. RESULTS: Opioids with a strong affinity for the micro-opioid receptor decreased the sensation in a variety of experimental pain modalities, but strong tonic pain was attenuated more than short lasting pain and non-painful sensations. The effects of opioids with weaker affinity for the micro-opioid receptor were detected by a more narrow range of pain models, and the assessment methods needed to be more sensitive. CONCLUSION: The way the pain is induced, assessed and summarized is very important for the sensitivity of the pain models. This review gives an overview of how different opioids perform in experimental pain models. Generally experimental pain models need to be designed with careful consideration of pharmacological mechanisms and pharmacokinetics of analgesics. This knowledge can aid the decisions needed to be taken when designing experimental pain studies for compounds entering phase 1 clinical trials.

U2 - 10.1111/j.1365-2125.2009.03456.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1365-2125.2009.03456.x

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 19694733

VL - 68

SP - 149

EP - 168

JO - British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

JF - British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

SN - 0306-5251

IS - 2

ER -