Anni Jeppesen

Younger age is associated with higher levels of self-reported affective and cognitive sequelae six months post-cardiac arrest

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Younger age is associated with higher levels of self-reported affective and cognitive sequelae six months post-cardiac arrest. / Evald, Lars; Brønnick, Kolbjørn; Duez, Christophe Henri Valdemar; Grejs, Anders Morten; Jeppesen, Anni Nørgaard; Søreide, Eldar; Kirkegaard, Hans; Nielsen, Jørgen Feldbæk.

I: Resuscitation, Bind 165, 08.2021, s. 148-153.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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@article{2271553f1420456c9d71d92e2c58cf04,
title = "Younger age is associated with higher levels of self-reported affective and cognitive sequelae six months post-cardiac arrest",
abstract = "Background: Affective and cognitive sequelae are frequently reported in cardiac arrest survivors; however, little is known about the risk factors. We assessed the hypothesis that self-reported affective and cognitive sequelae six months after OHCA may be associated with demography, acute care and cerebral outcome. Methods: This is a sub-study of the multicentre “Target Temperature Management for 48 vs. 24 h and Neurologic Outcome after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Randomised Clinical Trial” (the TTH48 trial) investigating the effect of prolonged TTM at 33 ± 1 °C. We invited patients with good outcome on the Cerebral Performances Categories (CPC score ≤ 2) to answer questionnaires on anxiety, depression, emotional distress, perceived stress and cognitive failures six months post OHCA. Results: In total 79 of 111 eligible patients were included in the analysis. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the included group and the group lost to follow-up. Younger age was a negative predictor across all self-reported outcomes, even when controlling for gender, ROSC time, treatment allocation, cognitive impairment and global outcome (CPC 1 or 2). Female gender was a predictor of anxiety, though this should be interpreted cautiously as only eight women participated. A CPC score of 2 score was a negative predictor of self-reported affective outcomes, albeit not for self-reported cognitive failures. Conclusion: Younger age was associated with higher levels of self-reported affective and cognitive sequelae six months post OHCA. Female gender may be associated with self-reported anxiety. A higher CPC score may be a proxy for self-reported affective sequelae.",
keywords = "Affective disorders, Anxiety, Cognition, Depression, OHCA, Out of hospital cardiac arrest, Outcome, Prognostication, Stress, DEPRESSION, FAILURES QUESTIONNAIRE, ANXIETY, TARGETED TEMPERATURE MANAGEMENT, SURVIVORS, Humans, Middle Aged, Self Report, Survivors, Male, Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest/therapy, Hypothermia, Induced, Female, Aged",
author = "Lars Evald and Kolbj{\o}rn Br{\o}nnick and Duez, {Christophe Henri Valdemar} and Grejs, {Anders Morten} and Jeppesen, {Anni N{\o}rgaard} and Eldar S{\o}reide and Hans Kirkegaard and Nielsen, {J{\o}rgen Feldb{\ae}k}",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2021 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
year = "2021",
month = aug,
doi = "10.1016/j.resuscitation.2021.04.009",
language = "English",
volume = "165",
pages = "148--153",
journal = "Resuscitation",
issn = "0300-9572",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Younger age is associated with higher levels of self-reported affective and cognitive sequelae six months post-cardiac arrest

AU - Evald, Lars

AU - Brønnick, Kolbjørn

AU - Duez, Christophe Henri Valdemar

AU - Grejs, Anders Morten

AU - Jeppesen, Anni Nørgaard

AU - Søreide, Eldar

AU - Kirkegaard, Hans

AU - Nielsen, Jørgen Feldbæk

N1 - Copyright © 2021 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PY - 2021/8

Y1 - 2021/8

N2 - Background: Affective and cognitive sequelae are frequently reported in cardiac arrest survivors; however, little is known about the risk factors. We assessed the hypothesis that self-reported affective and cognitive sequelae six months after OHCA may be associated with demography, acute care and cerebral outcome. Methods: This is a sub-study of the multicentre “Target Temperature Management for 48 vs. 24 h and Neurologic Outcome after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Randomised Clinical Trial” (the TTH48 trial) investigating the effect of prolonged TTM at 33 ± 1 °C. We invited patients with good outcome on the Cerebral Performances Categories (CPC score ≤ 2) to answer questionnaires on anxiety, depression, emotional distress, perceived stress and cognitive failures six months post OHCA. Results: In total 79 of 111 eligible patients were included in the analysis. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the included group and the group lost to follow-up. Younger age was a negative predictor across all self-reported outcomes, even when controlling for gender, ROSC time, treatment allocation, cognitive impairment and global outcome (CPC 1 or 2). Female gender was a predictor of anxiety, though this should be interpreted cautiously as only eight women participated. A CPC score of 2 score was a negative predictor of self-reported affective outcomes, albeit not for self-reported cognitive failures. Conclusion: Younger age was associated with higher levels of self-reported affective and cognitive sequelae six months post OHCA. Female gender may be associated with self-reported anxiety. A higher CPC score may be a proxy for self-reported affective sequelae.

AB - Background: Affective and cognitive sequelae are frequently reported in cardiac arrest survivors; however, little is known about the risk factors. We assessed the hypothesis that self-reported affective and cognitive sequelae six months after OHCA may be associated with demography, acute care and cerebral outcome. Methods: This is a sub-study of the multicentre “Target Temperature Management for 48 vs. 24 h and Neurologic Outcome after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Randomised Clinical Trial” (the TTH48 trial) investigating the effect of prolonged TTM at 33 ± 1 °C. We invited patients with good outcome on the Cerebral Performances Categories (CPC score ≤ 2) to answer questionnaires on anxiety, depression, emotional distress, perceived stress and cognitive failures six months post OHCA. Results: In total 79 of 111 eligible patients were included in the analysis. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the included group and the group lost to follow-up. Younger age was a negative predictor across all self-reported outcomes, even when controlling for gender, ROSC time, treatment allocation, cognitive impairment and global outcome (CPC 1 or 2). Female gender was a predictor of anxiety, though this should be interpreted cautiously as only eight women participated. A CPC score of 2 score was a negative predictor of self-reported affective outcomes, albeit not for self-reported cognitive failures. Conclusion: Younger age was associated with higher levels of self-reported affective and cognitive sequelae six months post OHCA. Female gender may be associated with self-reported anxiety. A higher CPC score may be a proxy for self-reported affective sequelae.

KW - Affective disorders

KW - Anxiety

KW - Cognition

KW - Depression

KW - OHCA

KW - Out of hospital cardiac arrest

KW - Outcome

KW - Prognostication

KW - Stress

KW - DEPRESSION

KW - FAILURES QUESTIONNAIRE

KW - ANXIETY

KW - TARGETED TEMPERATURE MANAGEMENT

KW - SURVIVORS

KW - Humans

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Self Report

KW - Survivors

KW - Male

KW - Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest/therapy

KW - Hypothermia, Induced

KW - Female

KW - Aged

U2 - 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2021.04.009

DO - 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2021.04.009

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33887400

VL - 165

SP - 148

EP - 153

JO - Resuscitation

JF - Resuscitation

SN - 0300-9572

ER -