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Annemarie Brüel

PTH treatment activates intracortical bone remodeling in patients with hypoparathyroidism

Publikation: KonferencebidragPosterForskning

Standard

PTH treatment activates intracortical bone remodeling in patients with hypoparathyroidism. / Sikjær, Tanja Tvistholm; Rejnmark, Lars; Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Brüel, Annemarie; Hauge, Ellen Margrethe; Delaisse, Jean-Marie; Andersen, Thomas Levin.

2017. Poster session præsenteret ved American Society of Bone and Mineral research annual meeting, Denver, USA.

Publikation: KonferencebidragPosterForskning

Harvard

Sikjær, TT, Rejnmark, L, Thomsen, JS, Brüel, A, Hauge, EM, Delaisse, J-M & Andersen, TL 2017, 'PTH treatment activates intracortical bone remodeling in patients with hypoparathyroidism', American Society of Bone and Mineral research annual meeting, Denver, USA, 08/09/2017 - 11/09/2017.

APA

Sikjær, T. T., Rejnmark, L., Thomsen, J. S., Brüel, A., Hauge, E. M., Delaisse, J-M., & Andersen, T. L. (2017). PTH treatment activates intracortical bone remodeling in patients with hypoparathyroidism. Poster session præsenteret ved American Society of Bone and Mineral research annual meeting, Denver, USA.

CBE

Sikjær TT, Rejnmark L, Thomsen JS, Brüel A, Hauge EM, Delaisse J-M, Andersen TL. 2017. PTH treatment activates intracortical bone remodeling in patients with hypoparathyroidism. Poster session præsenteret ved American Society of Bone and Mineral research annual meeting, Denver, USA.

MLA

Sikjær, Tanja Tvistholm o.a.. PTH treatment activates intracortical bone remodeling in patients with hypoparathyroidism. American Society of Bone and Mineral research annual meeting, 08 sep. 2017, Denver, USA, Poster, 2017.

Vancouver

Sikjær TT, Rejnmark L, Thomsen JS, Brüel A, Hauge EM, Delaisse J-M o.a.. PTH treatment activates intracortical bone remodeling in patients with hypoparathyroidism. 2017. Poster session præsenteret ved American Society of Bone and Mineral research annual meeting, Denver, USA.

Author

Sikjær, Tanja Tvistholm ; Rejnmark, Lars ; Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus ; Brüel, Annemarie ; Hauge, Ellen Margrethe ; Delaisse, Jean-Marie ; Andersen, Thomas Levin. / PTH treatment activates intracortical bone remodeling in patients with hypoparathyroidism. Poster session præsenteret ved American Society of Bone and Mineral research annual meeting, Denver, USA.

Bibtex

@conference{68bcb738595743338ee80b9af9fb93e4,
title = "PTH treatment activates intracortical bone remodeling in patients with hypoparathyroidism",
abstract = "Hypoparathyroidism (hypoPT) is characterized by a state of low bone turnover and high BMD. We have previously shown that hypoPT patients treated with PTH(1-84) for six months have highly increased bone turnover markers and a decrease in aBMD at the hip and spine(1). The present study aims to investigate the effect of PTH(1-84) on cortical bone and intracortical bone remodeling in hypoPT. The study was conducted on 20 transiliac bone biopsies from hypoPT patients after six months of treatment with either PTH(1-84) 100 µg s.c./day N=10 or placebo N=10. The groups were age- (±6 years) and gender-matched. Age, duration of disease, and etiology of hypoPT did not differ between groups. A comprehensive analysis of the cortical bone was performed including estimates of cortical porosity, and pore density (# of pores/mm2). The remodeling stage of all intracortical pores was evaluated, and pore area and diameter were measured. Cortical porosity and pore density did not differ between groups, but PTH treatment had a marked effect on the remodeling status of the pores. The percentage of pores undergoing remodeling was higher in the PTH-group than in placebo-group reported as median values (IQR[25-75%]) (52% [45-59%] vs. 18% [12-34%] of pore number, p<0.001). Interestingly, this PTH-induced increase was mainly due to a higher proportion of formative pores (27% [23-40%] vs. 6% [3-7%]; p<0.001) and mixed resorptive/formative pores (15% [9-16%] vs. 4% [1-8%]; p=0.004), whereas the percentage of resorptive pores (9% [5-11%] vs. 11% [6-19%], ns) did not differ between the PTH- and the placebo-group, respectively. The PTH-induced change was even greater when assessing the cortical porosity (% of pore area) rather than the pore number; PTH- vs. placebo-treated: resorptive pores 10% [3-20%] vs. 37% [8-74%] (p=0.02); mixed resorptive and formative pores 48% [36-61%] vs. 7% [1-17%] (p<0.001); formative pores 24% [16-32%] vs. 1% [1-3%] (p<0.001). Collectively, these data suggest an increased activation of intracortical bone remodeling with a change in the relative proportion of resorptive and formative pores, which may be due to a shortening of the intracortical resorptive/reversal phase in response to PTH treatment of hypoPT. Furthermore, the PTH-treatment did not increase cortical porosity or pore density. ",
author = "Sikj{\ae}r, {Tanja Tvistholm} and Lars Rejnmark and Thomsen, {Jesper Skovhus} and Annemarie Br{\"u}el and Hauge, {Ellen Margrethe} and Jean-Marie Delaisse and Andersen, {Thomas Levin}",
year = "2017",
month = sep,
day = "8",
language = "English",
note = "null ; Conference date: 08-09-2017 Through 11-09-2017",

}

RIS

TY - CONF

T1 - PTH treatment activates intracortical bone remodeling in patients with hypoparathyroidism

AU - Sikjær, Tanja Tvistholm

AU - Rejnmark, Lars

AU - Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus

AU - Brüel, Annemarie

AU - Hauge, Ellen Margrethe

AU - Delaisse, Jean-Marie

AU - Andersen, Thomas Levin

PY - 2017/9/8

Y1 - 2017/9/8

N2 - Hypoparathyroidism (hypoPT) is characterized by a state of low bone turnover and high BMD. We have previously shown that hypoPT patients treated with PTH(1-84) for six months have highly increased bone turnover markers and a decrease in aBMD at the hip and spine(1). The present study aims to investigate the effect of PTH(1-84) on cortical bone and intracortical bone remodeling in hypoPT. The study was conducted on 20 transiliac bone biopsies from hypoPT patients after six months of treatment with either PTH(1-84) 100 µg s.c./day N=10 or placebo N=10. The groups were age- (±6 years) and gender-matched. Age, duration of disease, and etiology of hypoPT did not differ between groups. A comprehensive analysis of the cortical bone was performed including estimates of cortical porosity, and pore density (# of pores/mm2). The remodeling stage of all intracortical pores was evaluated, and pore area and diameter were measured. Cortical porosity and pore density did not differ between groups, but PTH treatment had a marked effect on the remodeling status of the pores. The percentage of pores undergoing remodeling was higher in the PTH-group than in placebo-group reported as median values (IQR[25-75%]) (52% [45-59%] vs. 18% [12-34%] of pore number, p<0.001). Interestingly, this PTH-induced increase was mainly due to a higher proportion of formative pores (27% [23-40%] vs. 6% [3-7%]; p<0.001) and mixed resorptive/formative pores (15% [9-16%] vs. 4% [1-8%]; p=0.004), whereas the percentage of resorptive pores (9% [5-11%] vs. 11% [6-19%], ns) did not differ between the PTH- and the placebo-group, respectively. The PTH-induced change was even greater when assessing the cortical porosity (% of pore area) rather than the pore number; PTH- vs. placebo-treated: resorptive pores 10% [3-20%] vs. 37% [8-74%] (p=0.02); mixed resorptive and formative pores 48% [36-61%] vs. 7% [1-17%] (p<0.001); formative pores 24% [16-32%] vs. 1% [1-3%] (p<0.001). Collectively, these data suggest an increased activation of intracortical bone remodeling with a change in the relative proportion of resorptive and formative pores, which may be due to a shortening of the intracortical resorptive/reversal phase in response to PTH treatment of hypoPT. Furthermore, the PTH-treatment did not increase cortical porosity or pore density.

AB - Hypoparathyroidism (hypoPT) is characterized by a state of low bone turnover and high BMD. We have previously shown that hypoPT patients treated with PTH(1-84) for six months have highly increased bone turnover markers and a decrease in aBMD at the hip and spine(1). The present study aims to investigate the effect of PTH(1-84) on cortical bone and intracortical bone remodeling in hypoPT. The study was conducted on 20 transiliac bone biopsies from hypoPT patients after six months of treatment with either PTH(1-84) 100 µg s.c./day N=10 or placebo N=10. The groups were age- (±6 years) and gender-matched. Age, duration of disease, and etiology of hypoPT did not differ between groups. A comprehensive analysis of the cortical bone was performed including estimates of cortical porosity, and pore density (# of pores/mm2). The remodeling stage of all intracortical pores was evaluated, and pore area and diameter were measured. Cortical porosity and pore density did not differ between groups, but PTH treatment had a marked effect on the remodeling status of the pores. The percentage of pores undergoing remodeling was higher in the PTH-group than in placebo-group reported as median values (IQR[25-75%]) (52% [45-59%] vs. 18% [12-34%] of pore number, p<0.001). Interestingly, this PTH-induced increase was mainly due to a higher proportion of formative pores (27% [23-40%] vs. 6% [3-7%]; p<0.001) and mixed resorptive/formative pores (15% [9-16%] vs. 4% [1-8%]; p=0.004), whereas the percentage of resorptive pores (9% [5-11%] vs. 11% [6-19%], ns) did not differ between the PTH- and the placebo-group, respectively. The PTH-induced change was even greater when assessing the cortical porosity (% of pore area) rather than the pore number; PTH- vs. placebo-treated: resorptive pores 10% [3-20%] vs. 37% [8-74%] (p=0.02); mixed resorptive and formative pores 48% [36-61%] vs. 7% [1-17%] (p<0.001); formative pores 24% [16-32%] vs. 1% [1-3%] (p<0.001). Collectively, these data suggest an increased activation of intracortical bone remodeling with a change in the relative proportion of resorptive and formative pores, which may be due to a shortening of the intracortical resorptive/reversal phase in response to PTH treatment of hypoPT. Furthermore, the PTH-treatment did not increase cortical porosity or pore density.

M3 - Poster

Y2 - 8 September 2017 through 11 September 2017

ER -