Anne Sofie Dam Laursen

Theoretical substitutions between dairy products and all-cause and cause-specific mortality. Results from the Danish diet, cancer and health cohort

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A daily intake of dairy products is recommended in many countries in order to maintain optimal health throughout life. However, evidence regarding the association between intake of individual dairy products and mortality is limited. We therfore, explored associations between intake of different dairy products and all-cause and cause-specific mortality using specified theoretical substitution analyses. We analysed data from 55 775 Danish men and women aged 50-64 years between 1993 and 1997. Information about dairy product intake at baseline was collected using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Information about vital status and causes of death was obtained through national registers. Measures of associations were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression. During a median follow-up of 19·0 years, 11 586 participants died. For all-cause mortality, we observed that the intake of low-fat milk, whole-fat milk or low-fat yogurt products in place of cheese was associated with a higher rate of death (hazard ratios between 1·03 and 1·12 per serving/d substituted). The same pattern was present for CVD mortality. For cancer mortality, whole-fat milk and low-fat yogurt products in place of cheese were also associated with a higher rate of death for men while for women, whole-fat milk in place of buttermilk was associated with a higher cancer mortality rate. The results appeared robust in several sensitivity analyses. Our results suggest that intake of low-fat milk, whole-fat milk or low-fat yogurt products in place of cheese is associated with a higher rate of all-cause and cause-specific mortality.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftThe British Journal of Nutrition
Vol/bind127
Nummer10
Sider (fra-til)1557-1566
Antal sider10
ISSN0007-1145
DOI
StatusUdgivet - maj 2022

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