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Anne Mette Lykke

Traditional knowledge regarding edible insects in Burkina Faso

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Dokumenter

DOI

  • Aminata Sere, Univ Ouaga I Prof Joseph KI Zerbo, Dept Biochim Microbiol
  • ,
  • Adjima Bougma, Univ Ouaga I Prof Joseph KI Zerbo, Dept Biochim Microbiol
  • ,
  • Judicael Thomas Ouilly, Univ Ouaga I Prof Joseph KI Zerbo, Dept Biochim Microbiol
  • ,
  • Mamadou Traore, Inst Environm & Rech Agr INERA, Dept Prod Forestieres
  • ,
  • Hassane Sangare, Univ Ouaga I Prof Joseph KI Zerbo, Dept Biochim Microbiol
  • ,
  • Anne Mette Lykke
  • Amade Ouedraogo, Univ Ouaga I Prof Joseph KI Zerbo, Dept Biol & Physiol Vegetale
  • ,
  • Olivier Gnankine, Univ Ouaga I Prof Joseph KI Zerbo, Dept Biol & Physiol Anim
  • ,
  • Imael Henri Nestor Bassole, Univ Ouaga I Prof Joseph KI Zerbo, Dept Biochim Microbiol

Background: Insects play an important role as a diet supplement in Burkina Faso, but the preferred insect species vary according to the phytogeographical zone, ethnic groups, and gender. The present study aims at documenting indigenous knowledge on edible insects in Burkina Faso.

Methods: A structured ethno-sociological survey was conducted with 360 informants in nine villages located in two phytogeographical zones of Burkina Faso. Identification of the insects was done according to the classification of Scholtz. Chi-square tests and principal component analysis were performed to test for significant differences in edible insect species preferences among phytogeographical zones, villages, ethnic groups, and gender.

Results: Edible insects were available at different times of the year. They were collected by hand picking, digging in the soil, and luring them into water traps. The edible insects collected were consumed fried, roasted, or grilled. All species were indifferently consumed by children, women, and men without regard to their ages. A total of seven edible insect species belonging to five orders were cited in the Sudanian zone of Burkina Faso. Macrotermes subhyalinus (Rambur), Cirina butyrospermi (Vuillet, 1911), Kraussaria angulifera (Krauss, 1877), Gryllus campestris (Linnaeus, 1758), and Carbula marginella (Thunberg) (35.66-8.47% of the citations) were most cited whereas Rhynchophorus phoenicis (Fabricius, 1801) and Oryctes sp. (3.41-0.27%) were least cited. Cirina butyrospermi was most cited in the South Sudanian zone, whereas Macrotermes subhyalinus and Kraussaria angulifera weremost cited in the North Sudanian zone but were cited in all nine villages. Cirina butyrospermi was preferred by Bobo, Guin, Sambla, Senoufo, and Turka ethnic groups whereas Macrotermes subhyalinus was preferred by Fulani, Mossi, and Toussian ethnic groups. Oryctes sp. was cited only by the Toussian.

Conclusion: A diversity of edible insects was consumed in both the South and North Sudanian zone of Burkina Faso with significant differences in species preferences according to phytogeographical zones, villages, ethnic groups, and gender.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer59
TidsskriftJournal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
Vol/bind14
Antal sider11
ISSN1746-4269
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 14 sep. 2018

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