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Anne Mette Lykke

Simulation of the long-term impact of soil restoration techniques on carbon content and structure of water stable aggregates in West Africa

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  • Jérôme T Yameogo, Polytechnic University of Bobo-Dioulasso (UPB) by University of Nazi Boni (UNB), 01 7 BP1091, Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso, Burkina Faso
  • Sotiria Panakoulia, Technical University of Crete (TUC), 8 School of Environmental Engineering, University 9 Campus, 73100 Chania, Greece, Grækenland
  • Manolis Kotronakis, Technical University of Crete (TUC), 8 School of Environmental Engineering, University 9 Campus, 73100 Chania, Greece, Grækenland
  • Irénée Somda, Polytechnic University of Bobo-Dioulasso (UPB) by University of Nazi Boni (UNB), 01 7 BP1091, Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso, Burkina Faso
  • Nikolaos P Nikolaidis, Technical University of Crete (TUC), 8 School of Environmental Engineering, University 9 Campus, 73100 Chania, Greece, Grækenland
  • Anne Mette Lykke
  • Jørgen Aagaard Axelsen
Soil and water conservation techniques have traditionally been
used in arid, semi-arid and dry sub-humid areas and particularly in
Burkina Faso to restore degraded soils using organic matter amendments.
The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of two restoration
techniques, "stone rows" and "stone rows + tree planting" on soil organic
carbon (SOC) sequestration and soil structure in terms of water stable
aggregates (WSA) as well as to assess the time required to restore the
fertility of these soils. The Carbon, Aggregate and Structure Turnover
(CAST) model was used to simulate the evolution of SOC content and WSA
formation under the two restoration techniques. Field experiments were
conducted using a randomized block design. Soil samples were class
fractionated followed by a micro-aggregate isolation procedure. The
results show that the two restoration techniques contributed
significantly to improving soil total carbon content. The calibration of
the CAST model resulted in annual carbon content increases of 5.2 and 8.2
t/ha for the "stone rows" and "stone rows + planting" respectively at 15
cm soil depth. This means that natural grassland vegetation with or
without trees behind stone rows will slowly improve soil quality in terms
of soil carbon content. The only WSA class that increase in amount by the
treatments was the silt-clay sized micro-aggregates, while the carbon
content of both small macro-aggregates, micro-aggregates, and silt-clay
sized micro-aggregates increased.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftSoil and Tillage Research
StatusAccepteret/In press - 31 jan. 2018

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