Aarhus University Seal / Aarhus Universitets segl

Ane Kirstine Brunbjerg

Diversity and abundance of epibiota on invasive and native estuarine gastropods depend on substratum and salinity

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  • Jakob Thyrring
  • Mads Solgaard Thomsen, School of Biological Sciences - Marine Ecology Research Group, New Zealand
  • Ane Kirstine Brunbjerg
  • Thomas Wernberg, UWA Oceans Institute and School og Plant Biology, Australien
Epibiosis is a common life form in estuarine ecosystems, where shell structures in particular, provide important attachment substrate for sessile species. Many studies have quantified variation in epibiota communities against a few environmental factors, but rarely studies have accounted for the concurrent influence of many environmental factors on epibiota communities. This study aimed to determine the importance of salinity, depth, wave exposure, habitat and shell type for community structure of sessile epibiota in the Swan River Estuary, Western Australia. We quantified the epibiota on 3,226 shells representing the common gastropod species in the estuary; Nassarius pauperatus, Bedeva paiva and Batillaria australs from various sites and habitats. Generalized linear models were used to model variability of richness and abundances of common functional groups and species for the above listed factors. The five factors accounted for 3-34% of the total deviance explained of the models, with shell type and salinity levels being the only significant factors in nine of 14 models. These results highlight an overwhelming importance of shell type and salinity in explaining estuarine epibiota communities but also that unaccounted factors needs to be included in studies to better understand the possible underlying causes of patterns in epibiota community structure.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftMarine and Freshwater Research
Vol/bind66
Nummer12
Sider (fra-til)1191-1200
Antal sider10
ISSN1323-1650
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 21 maj 2015

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