Aarhus University Seal / Aarhus Universitets segl

DASTS 2016 Conference

Aktivitet: Deltagelse i eller arrangement af en begivenhed - typerDeltagelse i eller organisering af konference

Se relationer på Aarhus Universitet

Lasse Blond - Deltager

“It could have been different” is the quintessential anti-determinist and anti-essentialist mantra of STS. This mantra is a simultaneous reflection on being and becoming, a concern with the past, present and the future. It is a mantra that implicates a care of the possible. The concern with future(s) is unprecedented and ranges across all scales. Climate change; financial technologies – ‘futures’ - allowing investment on presumptions; and gene tests for diagnosing (the probability) of ailments to appear later in life, are but a few evident examples. Predicting, forecasting, foresighting future(s) is an inextricable part of the present and the role of science and technology in the production as well as the anticipation of the future(s), is paramount. Arguably for the first time in centuries the future looks gloomy, rather than bright. A concern with future(s) is central to the field of STS. When future(s) are made – not given – as suggested above, how they are made becomes a central and painstaking concern. What constitutes the practices and sociotechnical arrangements of future making? What future(s) follows from our current arrangements, infrastructures and ways of engaging? What diagnosis of the present – what nature(s) - does specific future making practices rest upon? And when future(s) are not entirely up to us and escapes us continuously, how are we disposed? The DASTS 2016 conference committee invites the Danish STS research milieu to engage with the practices of future(s) and future making. Keynotes by Isabelle Stengers and Nikolas Rose.
2 jun. 20163 jun. 2016

Konference

KonferenceDASTS 2016 Conference
AfholdelsesstedAarhus University
LandDanmark
ByAarhus
Periode02/06/201603/06/2016

    Emneord

  • STS, Futures, Science and everyday life, science and politics, Science and Society, quantifying self, Health Care, Environmental Attitudes

ID: 100612034