The effect of antibiotics and diet on enterolactone concentration and metabolome studied by targeted and non-targeted LC-MS metabolomics

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The effect of antibiotics and diet on enterolactone concentration and metabolome studied by targeted and non-targeted LC-MS metabolomics. / Bolvig, Anne Katrine; Nørskov, Natalja; Hedemann, Mette Skou; Foldager, Leslie; McCarthy-Sinclair, Brendan; Marco, Maria; Lærke, Helle Nygaard; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach.

In: Journal of Proteome Research, Vol. 16, No. 6, 02.06.2017, p. 2135-2150.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewJournal article

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@article{a2a8e90dd25249bcbcddec404fe2f521,
title = "The effect of antibiotics and diet on enterolactone concentration and metabolome studied by targeted and non-targeted LC-MS metabolomics",
abstract = "High plant lignan intake is associated with a number of health benefits, possibly induced by the lignan metabolite enterolactone (ENL). The gut microbiota plays a crucial role in converting dietary lignans into ENL, and epidemiological studies have shown that use of antibiotics is associated with lower levels of ENL. Here, we investigate the link between antibiotic use and lignan metabolism in pigs using LC-MS/MS. The effect of lignan intake and antibiotic use on the gut microbial community and the pig metabolome is studied by 16S rRNA sequencing and non-targeted LC-MS. Treatment with antibiotics resulted in substantially lower concentrations of ENL compared to concentrations detected in untreated animals, whereas the plasma concentrations of plant lignans were unchanged. Both diet and antibiotic treatment affected the clustering of urinary metabolites, and significantly altered the proportions of taxa in the gut microbiota. Diet, but not antibiotic treatment, affected the plasma lipid profile and a lower concentration of LDL-cholesterol was observed in the pigs fed a high lignan diet. This study provides solid support for the associations between ENL concentrations and use of antibiotics found in humans, and indicates that the lower ENL concentration may be a consequence of the ecological changes in the microbiota.",
keywords = "Enterolactone, metabolomics, lignans, microbiota, antibiotics",
author = "Bolvig, {Anne Katrine} and Natalja Nørskov and Hedemann, {Mette Skou} and Leslie Foldager and Brendan McCarthy-Sinclair and Maria Marco and Lærke, {Helle Nygaard} and Knudsen, {Knud Erik Bach}",
year = "2017",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1021/acs.jproteome.6b00942",
volume = "16",
pages = "2135--2150",
journal = "Journal of Proteome Research",
issn = "1535-3893",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of antibiotics and diet on enterolactone concentration and metabolome studied by targeted and non-targeted LC-MS metabolomics

AU - Bolvig,Anne Katrine

AU - Nørskov,Natalja

AU - Hedemann,Mette Skou

AU - Foldager,Leslie

AU - McCarthy-Sinclair,Brendan

AU - Marco,Maria

AU - Lærke,Helle Nygaard

AU - Knudsen,Knud Erik Bach

PY - 2017/6/2

Y1 - 2017/6/2

N2 - High plant lignan intake is associated with a number of health benefits, possibly induced by the lignan metabolite enterolactone (ENL). The gut microbiota plays a crucial role in converting dietary lignans into ENL, and epidemiological studies have shown that use of antibiotics is associated with lower levels of ENL. Here, we investigate the link between antibiotic use and lignan metabolism in pigs using LC-MS/MS. The effect of lignan intake and antibiotic use on the gut microbial community and the pig metabolome is studied by 16S rRNA sequencing and non-targeted LC-MS. Treatment with antibiotics resulted in substantially lower concentrations of ENL compared to concentrations detected in untreated animals, whereas the plasma concentrations of plant lignans were unchanged. Both diet and antibiotic treatment affected the clustering of urinary metabolites, and significantly altered the proportions of taxa in the gut microbiota. Diet, but not antibiotic treatment, affected the plasma lipid profile and a lower concentration of LDL-cholesterol was observed in the pigs fed a high lignan diet. This study provides solid support for the associations between ENL concentrations and use of antibiotics found in humans, and indicates that the lower ENL concentration may be a consequence of the ecological changes in the microbiota.

AB - High plant lignan intake is associated with a number of health benefits, possibly induced by the lignan metabolite enterolactone (ENL). The gut microbiota plays a crucial role in converting dietary lignans into ENL, and epidemiological studies have shown that use of antibiotics is associated with lower levels of ENL. Here, we investigate the link between antibiotic use and lignan metabolism in pigs using LC-MS/MS. The effect of lignan intake and antibiotic use on the gut microbial community and the pig metabolome is studied by 16S rRNA sequencing and non-targeted LC-MS. Treatment with antibiotics resulted in substantially lower concentrations of ENL compared to concentrations detected in untreated animals, whereas the plasma concentrations of plant lignans were unchanged. Both diet and antibiotic treatment affected the clustering of urinary metabolites, and significantly altered the proportions of taxa in the gut microbiota. Diet, but not antibiotic treatment, affected the plasma lipid profile and a lower concentration of LDL-cholesterol was observed in the pigs fed a high lignan diet. This study provides solid support for the associations between ENL concentrations and use of antibiotics found in humans, and indicates that the lower ENL concentration may be a consequence of the ecological changes in the microbiota.

KW - Enterolactone

KW - metabolomics

KW - lignans

KW - microbiota

KW - antibiotics

U2 - 10.1021/acs.jproteome.6b00942

DO - 10.1021/acs.jproteome.6b00942

M3 - Journal article

VL - 16

SP - 2135

EP - 2150

JO - Journal of Proteome Research

T2 - Journal of Proteome Research

JF - Journal of Proteome Research

SN - 1535-3893

IS - 6

ER -