In utero development of central ANG-stimulated pressor response and hypothalamic fos expression

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  • Zhice Xu, Denmark
  • Lijun Shi, Denmark
  • Fang Hu, Denmark
  • Rodney White, Denmark
  • Lauren Stewart
  • ,
  • Jiaming Yao, Denmark

Central renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is as important as the peripheral RAS in the control of the cardiovascular homeostasis in the adult. However, previous fetal studies on angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced cardiovascular responses focused exclusively on the peripheral side. Thus, few data exist characterizing the in utero development of central angiotensin-mediated pressor responses. The present study determined cardiovascular responses to central application of ANG II in the chronically prepared near-term ovine fetus, and determined the action sites marked by c-fos expression in the fetal hypothalamus following intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of ANG II in utero. ANG II significantly increased fetal systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure (MAP) within 5 min after injection of this peptide into the brain. Adjusted fetal MAP against amniotic pressure was also increased by icv ANG II, associated with increased c-fos in the central putative cardiovascular area--the paraventricular nuclei (PVN). Application of ANG II also induced intense c-fos expression in the supraoptic nuclei (SON), accompanied by a significant increase of fetal plasma vasopressin (AVP) levels, while maternal blood pressure (BP) and plasma AVP concentration were not changed. These results indicate that the central ANG II-mediated pressor response is functional at the last third of gestation, acting at the sites consistent with the cardiovascular neural network in the hypothalamus.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBrain Research
Volume145
Issue2
Pages (from-to)169-76
Number of pages8
ISSN0165-3806
Publication statusPublished - 12 Nov 2003

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