Temperature controlled airflow ventilation in operating rooms compared with laminar airflow and turbulent mixed airflow

Research output: Research - peer-reviewJournal article

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  • Malin Alsved
  • Anette Civilis
    Anette CivilisClinical Sciences Helsingborg, Lund University, Helsingborg, Sweden.
  • Peter Ekolind
    Peter EkolindAvidicare AB, Lund, Sweden.
  • Ann Tammelin
    Ann TammelinDepartment of Medicine Solna, Unit of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
  • Annette Erichsen Andersson
    Annette Erichsen AnderssonUniversity of Gothenburg
  • Jonas Jakobsson
    Jonas JakobssonErgonomics and Aerosol Technology (EAT), Department of Design Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
  • Tobias Svensson
    Tobias SvenssonErgonomics and Aerosol Technology (EAT), Department of Design Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
  • Matts Ramstorp
    Matts RamstorpErgonomics and Aerosol Technology (EAT), Department of Design Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
  • Sasan Sadrizadeh
    Sasan SadrizadehFluid and Climate Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California, USA.
  • Per-Anders Larsson
    Per-Anders LarssonClinical Sciences Helsingborg, Lund University, Helsingborg, Sweden.
  • Mats Bohgard
    Mats BohgardErgonomics and Aerosol Technology (EAT), Department of Design Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
  • Tina Šantl-Temkiv
  • Jakob Löndahl
    Jakob LöndahlErgonomics and Aerosol Technology (EAT), Department of Design Sciences, Lund University, Sweden. Electronic address: jakob.londahl@design.lth.se.

AIM: To evaluate three types of ventilation systems for operating rooms with respect to air cleanliness (in colony forming units, CFU/m(3)), energy consumption, and working environment comfort (noise and draught) as reported by surgical team members.

METHODS: Two commonly used ventilation systems, vertical laminar airflow (LAF) and turbulent mixed airflow (TMA), were compared with a newly developed ventilation technique: temperature controlled airflow (TcAF). CFU concentrations were measured at three locations in an operating room during 45 orthopaedic surgeries: close to the wound (<40 cm), at the instrument table, and peripherally in the room. The operating team evaluated the working environment comfort by answering a questionnaire.

FINDINGS: We showed that LAF and TcAF, but not TMA, resulted in less than 10 CFU/m(3) at all measurement locations in the room during ongoing surgery. Median values of CFU/m(3) close to the wound (250 samples) were 0 for LAF, 1 for TcAF and 10 for TMA. Peripherally in the room, the CFU concentrations were lowest for TcAF. The CFU concentrations did not scale proportionally with airflow rates. Compared to LAF, TcAF's power consumption was 28% lower and there was significantly less disturbance from noise and draught.

CONCLUSION: TcAF and LAF remove bacteria more efficiently from the air than TMA, especially close to the wound and instrument table. Like LAF, the new TcAF ventilation system maintained very low levels of CFU in the air, but TcAF used substantially less energy and provided a more comfortable working environment than LAF. This enables energy savings with preserved air quality.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Hospital Infection
ISSN0195-6701
DOIs
StateE-pub ahead of print - 24 Oct 2017

    Research areas

  • Journal Article

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