Time-series Analysis of Broadband Photometry of Neptune from K2

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article

  • Jason F. Rowe
    Jason F. RoweInstitut de recherche sur les exoplanètes, iREx, Département de physique, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, H3C 3J7, Canada jason@astro.umontreal.ca 0000-0002-5904-1865
  • Patrick Gaulme
    Patrick GaulmeApache Point Observatory, 2001 Apache Point Road, P.O. Box 59, sunspot, NM 88349, USA 0000-0001-8330-5464
  • Jack J. Lissauer
    Jack J. LissauerNASA Ames Research Center, Space Science & Astrobiology Divison, MS 245-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035, USA
  • Mark S. Marley
    Mark S. MarleyNASA Ames Research Center, Space Science & Astrobiology Divison, MS 245-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035, USA 0000-0002-5251-2943
  • Amy A. Simon
    Amy A. SimonNASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar System Exploration Division (690.0), 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA 0000-0003-4641-6186
  • Heidi B. Hammel
    Heidi B. HammelAURA, Inc., 1331 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Suite 1475, Washington, DC 20004, USA
  • Víctor Silva Aguirre
  • Thomas Barclay
    Thomas BarclayBay Area Environmental Research Institute, 625 2nd Street, Ste. 209, Petaluma, CA 94952, USA 0000-0001-7139-2724
  • Othman Benomar
    Othman BenomarCenter for Space Science, NYUAD Institute, New York University Abu Dhabi, P.O. Box 129188, Abu Dhabi, UAE 0000-0001-9405-5552
  • Patrick Boumier
    Patrick BoumierInstitut d’Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, (UMR 8617), F-91405 Orsay Cedex, France
  • Douglas A. Caldwell
    Douglas A. CaldwellSETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043, USA
  • Sarah L. Casewell
    Sarah L. CasewellUniversity of Leicester, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH, UK 0000-0003-2478-0120
  • William J. Chaplin
    William J. ChaplinStellar Astrophysics Centre (SAC), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark 0000-0002-5714-8618University of BirmingahmUnited Kingdom
  • Knicole D. Colon
    Knicole D. ColonBay Area Environmental Research Institute, 625 2nd Street, Ste. 209, Petaluma, CA 94952, USA
  • Enrico Corsaro
    Enrico CorsaroDepartamento de Astrofísica, Universidad de La Laguna, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain
  • G. R. Davies
    G. R. DaviesSchool of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston Park Road, West Midlands, Birmingham, B15 2TT UK 0000-0002-4290-7351Aarhus UniversityUnited Kingdom
  • Jonathan Fortney
    Jonathan FortneyUniversity of California, Santa Cruz, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 1156 High Street, 275 Interdisciplinary Sciences Building, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA 0000-0002-9843-4354
  • Rafael A. García
    Rafael A. GarcíaService d’Astrophysique, IRFU/DRF/CEA Saclay L’Orme des Merisiers, bat. 709, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, France
  • John E. Gizis
    John E. GizisUniversity of Delaware, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 104 The Green, Newark, DE 19716, USA 0000-0002-8916-1972
  • Michael R. Haas
    Michael R. HaasNASA Ames Research Center, Space Science & Astrobiology Divison, MS 245-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035, USA
  • Benoît Mosser
    Benoît MosserLESIA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Université Paris Diderot, F-92195 Meudon, France cedex, France
  • Francois-Xavier Schmider
    Francois-Xavier SchmiderUniversité de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de Côte d’Azur, Laboratoire Lagrange, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4, France
We report here on our search for excess power in photometry of Neptune collected by the K2 mission that may be due to intrinsic global oscillations of the planet Neptune. To conduct this search, we developed new methods to correct for instrumental effects such as intrapixel variability and gain variations. We then extracted and analyzed the time-series photometry of Neptune from 49 days of nearly continuous broadband photometry of the planet. We find no evidence of global oscillations and place an upper limit of ∼5 ppm at 1000 μ {Hz} for the detection of a coherent signal. With an observed cadence of 1 minute and a point-to-point scatter of less than 0.01%, the photometric signal is dominated by reflected light from the Sun, which is in turn modulated by atmospheric variability of Neptune at the 2% level. A change in flux is also observed due to the increasing distance between Neptune and the K2 spacecraft and the solar variability with convection-driven solar p modes present.
Original languageEnglish
JournalThe Astronomical Journal
Volume153
Issue number4
Number of pages11
ISSN0004-6256
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

    Keywords

  • planetary systems, planets and satellites: gaseous planets

See relations at Aarhus University Citationformats

ID: 111201099