The Mesolithic occupation at Isolidda (San Vito lo Capo), Sicily

Research output: Research - peer-reviewJournal article

  • Domenico Lo Vetro
    Domenico Lo Vetro Dipartimento di Storia, Archeologia, Geografia, Arte e Spettacolo (SAGAS) – Archeologia Preistorica, Università degli Studi di Firenze, via Museo e Istituto Fiorentino di Preistoria “P.Graziosi”Italy
  • Andrè C. Colonese
    Andrè C. ColoneseBioArCh, Department of Archaeology, University of York
  • Marcello Mannino
  • Kenneth D. Thomas
    Kenneth D. ThomasInstitute of Archaeology, University College London, London, UK
  • Zelia Di Giuseppe
    Zelia Di GiuseppeMuseo e Istituto Fiorentino di Preistoria “P.Graziosi”
  • Fabio Martini
    Fabio MartiniDipartimento di Storia, Archeologia, Geografia, Arte e Spettacolo (SAGAS) – Archeologia Preistorica, Università degli Studi di Firenze, via Museo e Istituto Fiorentino di Preistoria “P.Graziosi”
‘Gruppo dell’Isolidda’ is a complex of five caves along a rocky cliff on the eastern side of the promontory of San Vito Lo Capo in NW Sicily. In 2004 archaeological excavations in the slope below the caves revealed a stratified deposit, partially in secondary position, containing levels with Late Epigravettian and Mesolithic stone tool assemblages. Early Mesolithic assemblages, characterized by backed microliths, were distributed in two contiguous layers (SU 21 and SU 25), the lowest of which (SU 21) also contained Epigravettian tools, probably due to sediment reworking. Three AMS dates on Phorcus turbinatus shells (~9520-9000 cal. BP) are chronologically compatible with the Early Mesolithic materials and suggest that the bulk of the deposit accumulated then. A third level, lying above the previous ones, contained artefacts associated to the Late Mesolithic or Early Neolithic. Faunal remains included abundant shells
of intertidal molluscs, along with few fragmented bones of terrestrial herbivores. Oxygen isotope analyses on shell carbonates of Phorcus turbinatus show that, around 9520-9000 cal. BP, marine molluscs were exploited year-round, albeit more often in autumn and winter.
Original languageEnglish
JournalPreistoria Alpina
Volume48
Pages (from-to)237-243
Number of pages7
ISSN0393-0157
StatePublished - 2016

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