Predictive Processes and the Peculiar Case of Music

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperReviewResearchpeer-review

  • Stefan Koelsch, University of Bergen
  • ,
  • Peter Vuust
  • Karl Friston, The Wellcome Centre for Human Neuroimaging, University College London, London, UK.

We suggest that music perception is an active act of listening, providing an irresistible epistemic offering. When listening to music we constantly generate plausible hypotheses about what could happen next, while actively attending to music resolves the ensuing uncertainty. Within the predictive coding framework, we present a novel formulation of precision filtering and attentional selection, which explains why some lower-level auditory, and even higher-level music-syntactic processes elicited by irregular events are relatively exempt from top-down predictive processes. We review findings providing unique evidence for the attentional selection of salient auditory features. This formulation suggests that 'listening' is a more active process than traditionally conceived in models of perception.

Original languageEnglish
JournalTrends in Cognitive Sciences
Volume23
Issue1
Pages (from-to)63-77
Number of pages15
ISSN1364-6613
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2019

Bibliographical note

Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

See relations at Aarhus University Citationformats

ID: 140861943